canary in the coal mine – gray wolves

Gray wolves could emerge as a “canary in the coal mine” of global warming by suggesting how climate change will affect species around the world, researchers say. “We’re not so much looking at wolves as a predator but as an indicator,” says environmental scientist Christopher Wilmers of the University of California-Berkeley. Shorter winters without wolves … Read more…

Canary in the coal mine – Mount Wheeler

As the climate changes, disappearing snow and ice on Wheeler Peak — Nevada’s second-highest mountain — raise concerns about the future of water in the state, for which the glacier plays an integral role. Climate change is expected to hit alpine ecosystems like Mount Wheeler’s hardest, said Steven Mietz, superintendent of Great Basin National Park. … Read more…

Canary in the coal mine – coffee

Coffee is the canary in the coal mine for climate change, says Ric Rhinehart, executive director of the Specialty Coffee Association of America. “If you can’t think about the long term risk for planetary impacts, think about the short term risk for your coffee. Know that a day without coffee is potentially around the corner.” … Read more…

Canary in the coal mine – beetles

Beetles, the new canary in a coalmine. Although this number appears to be small, it has effectively removed nature’s ecological cold curtain enabling mountain pine beetles an opportunity to speed up their life cycle, invade and decimate high elevation pine forests across the continent. Instead of absorbing CO2, billions of beetle-killed trees across the West … Read more…

Canary in the coal mine – amphibians

Amphibians: Canaries in the environmental coal mine. Amphibian die-off, like the death of canaries by noxious gases in coal mines during the last century, may be warning us of serious environmental dangers ahead. Frogwatch USA is a partnership program affiliated with USGS and designed to enlist the aid of volunteers in describing and monitoring amphibians … Read more…

Canary in the coal mine – moose

Moose are “the canary in the coal mine,” Doug Inkley, a senior scientist at the National Wildlife Federation, told USA Today. “As a large-bodied animal that needs cool temperatures, it is particularly susceptible to climate change.” The Active Times, 1 Mar 2013

Canary in the coal mine – freshwater mussels

During laboratory tests, USGS scientists and partners found that the heart and growth rates of some species of young freshwater mussels declined as a result of elevated water temperatures, and many died. Freshwater mussels have been compared to the “canary in the coal mine” in that they are indicators of good water and sediment quality … Read more…

Canary in the coal mine – pikas

American pikas: The Rocky Mountains’ ‘canary in the coal mine’. Sure, they’re cute little animals, but why should we care about pika populations? We should care because their numbers are declining due to changes in global weather patterns — global warming. The Guardian, 24 Oct 2011

Canary in the coal mine – Florida Keys

“We are feeling some of the most severe impacts of climate change first, and we have no escape route,” says Alison Higgins, President of Florida Keys Green Living and Energy Education and staff of The Nature Conservancy, thinking about the limitations to adaptation in the Keys. “We’re the canary in the coal mine for climate … Read more…

Canary in the coal mine – shrimp

Shrimp like canaries in coal mine, indicating health of stocks, water temperature. Peter Koeller, a Canadian fisheries scientist, said the findings shed light on the complex mating habits of the Pandalus borealis, the shrimp species that makes up one of the world’s largest fisheries and sustains an industry worth $500 million a year in the … Read more…

Canary in the coal mine – Maldives

Maldives May Be Canary In The Coal Mine. Alas, the high point in this entire nation of 1,200 islands is only 8 feet above sea level. So people here worry that eventually the entire nation may have to move, making the Maldives perhaps the first country in the world to be destroyed by global warming. … Read more…

Canary in the coal mine – estuaries

When it comes to climate change impacts, estuaries are the proverbial canaries in the coal mine. These unique habitats, which are also home to 22 of the world’s 32 largest cities and are essential hubs for global commerce, face not just the threat posed by rising sea levels, but also a complex nexus of increasing … Read more…

Canary in the coal mine – lobster

The New England lobster, under threat from disease and invasive species, may be the “canary in the coal mine” of climate disruption, according to a new report that examines case studies from around the nation about how global warming is altering wildlife habitats. Lobsters are king, Wahle said. “If lobsters aren’t the canary in the … Read more…

Canary in the coal mine – walrus

Huge Walrus Haul-Out Signals Latest ‘Canary in the Coalmine’ for Climate Change in the Arctic. Margaret Williams, managing director of the World Wildlife Fund’s Arctic program told the Associated Press, “The walruses are telling us what the polar bears have told us and what many indigenous people have told us in the high Arctic, and … Read more…

Canary in the coal mine – oysters

A company near San Diego raises oysters. Last year, Dennis Peterson says they could only get a quarter of the young oysters, or seed, they need from hatcheries in the Pacific Northwest. Dennis Peterson worries about what that means for his oysters. “When it comes to climate change,” he says, “the oyster in the ocean … Read more…

Canary in the coal mine – monarch butterfly

The poster child for conservation is at risk of being at risk. Environmental groups across the country are stepping up efforts to increase the population of monarch butterflies as the insects face being designated as a species at risk. “They’re currently an international species of concern. The monarch butterfly is like the canary in the … Read more…

Canary in the coal mine – frog

Thus a climate canary would be an animal that is susceptible to the impacts of climate change. In that sense, frogs and other amphibians could be considered the “Canaries of global warming”. Environmental Systems Studies: A Macroscope for Understanding and Operating … By Hidefumi Imura published by Springer, Japan, 2013 p49

Canary in the coal mine – finch

When it comes to global warming, the canary in the coal mine isn’t a canary at all. It’s a purple finch. An Audubon Society study released Tuesday found that more than half of 305 birds species in North America, a hodgepodge that includes robins, gulls, chickadees and owls, are spending the winter about 35 miles … Read more…

Canary in the coal mine – gray wolves

Gray wolves could emerge as a “canary in the coal mine” of global warming by suggesting how climate change will affect species around the world, researchers say. We’re not so much looking at wolves as a predator but as an indicator, says environmental scientist Christopher Wilmers of the University of California-Berkeley. USAToday, 30 May 2005

Canary in the coal mine – Japan

Japan is the “canary in the coal mine” for the rest of the world. Can Japan radically shift its energy policy away from nuclear and fossil fuel, become greener, more self-sufficient, and avoid catastrophic impacts on the climate? Science Blogs, Mark Pendergrast, 21 Nov 2011

Canary in the coal mine – Maryland’s Native Brook Trout

Maryland’s Native Brook Trout – The “Canary in the Coal Mine” for Climate Warming? If summer stream water temperatures increase past tolerance limits, Brook Trout populations will be reduced and extirpated – the proverbial “Canary in the Coal Mine” for climate warming-induced change. Alan Heft, Maryland Department of Natural Resources Fisheries

Canary in the coal mine – Australian grape growers

Australian grape growers reckon they are the canary in the coal mine of global warming, as a long drought forces winemakers to rethink the styles of wine they can produce and the regions they can grow in. Scientists say Australia’s vast inland grape-growing districts face the greatest degrees of warming. The Star, 26 Mar 2008

Canary in the coal mine – Alaska

At a Senate hearing on Thursday, Sen. Bernie Sanders called Alaska the “canary in the coal mine” on climate change and cited threats to Native American communities from rising seas as a result of global warming. The village of Newtok, Alaska, near the Arctic Circle, may be underwater by 2017, according to the U.S. Army … Read more…

Canary in the coal mine – Napa Valley

Is Napa Valley the canary in the coal mine? Climate change, the bad, the good and the unknown… There is little consideration for the potential impact of global warming on all forms of agriculture and human and animal activity – were this apocalypse to come true, one could argue that world hunger, deforestation, coastal flooding … Read more…

Canary in the coal mine – air travel

Canary in the coalmine: Norwegian attitudes towards climate change and extreme long-haul air travel to Aotearoa/New Zealand. Aviation has been identified as a rapidly growing contributor to CO2 emissions. This article reports on a research project that explored Norwegian attitudes towards climate change, particularly as they relate to extreme long-haul air travel to Aotearoa/New Zealand. … Read more…

Canary in the coal mine – Canadian mines

Canary in a coal mine: perceptions of climate change risks and response options among Canadian mine operations. A survey documenting how climate change is perceived and responded to by Canadian mine operations was administered to a random sample of practitioners working at mine sites across Canada. Climatic Change December 2011, Volume 109, Issue 3-4, pp … Read more…

Canary in the coal mine – cherry blossoms

DC’s Cherry Blossoms as Climate Change Canary…As a native of the Washington area, the Cherry Blossoms are perhaps the quintessential universal symbol of nature’s beauty. In short, a November 11 published scientific study from University of Washington suggests that Washington, D.C., will have to move the Cherry Blossom up by nearly a month by 2050 … Read more…

Canary in the coal mine – Kiribati

There is a tendency in much of the world to view climate change as a slow and gradual process where the harmful effects will be able to prevented before they occur. What is happening in Kiribati is evidence to the contrary. Kiribati is “like the canary in the coal mine in terms of the dramatic … Read more…

Canary in the coal mine – Aspen

The Canary Initiative is so named because Aspen (which is economically dependent on winter snow for recreation and summer snow pack for water supply) sees itself as a canary in the coal mine for climate change. The Initiative called for: a green house gas (GHG) emissions inventory, an assessment of impacts due to climate change, … Read more…

Canary in the coal mine – coral

Corals, Earth’s Canary in Coal Mines, Facing ‘Calamitous’ Global Declines. The current state of most of the world’s coral reefs is so calamitous that it’s difficult to over-dramatize the situation. Reefs have seen massive declines around the globe, and while there is much debate about which particular threat is most responsible, most scientists agree humans … Read more…

Canary in the coal mine – big trees

The researchers suspect that climate change is the biggest culprit and that big trees are acting as the ‘canary in the coalmine’ for the effects of global warming on the world’s forests. Big trees are more susceptible to high temperatures and water shortages than smaller trees. “Older, larger trees are declining because of disease, drought, … Read more…

Canary in the coal mine – Australia

He was talking about the floods in his region, but the sense that Australia – which maintains one of the highest per-capita carbon footprints on the planet – has summoned up the wrath of the climate gods is everywhere. “Australia is the canary in the coal mine,” says David Karoly, a top climate researcher at … Read more…

Canary in the coal mine – Arctic

“Climate change in the Arctic is a reality now!” So insists Robert Corell, an oceanographer with the American Meteorological Society. Wild-eyed proclamations are all too common when it comes to global warming, but in this case his assertion seems well founded. That points to one reason the world should pay attention to this week’s report. … Read more…

Canary in the coal mine – India

Bill Pritchard and John Duncan on some of the challenges facing the food system in India, and why India is the canary in the coal mine for climate change and food. Less than a year ago, the IPCC released its 5th Assessment Report. This report sought to address, head-on, the interactions between a changing climate … Read more…

Canary in the coal mine – national parks

David Frey: National Parks are a climate change canary. National parks across the country are facing landscape-altering changes at the hands of global warming. Most famous is the melting ice at Glacier National Park in Montana. The question at hand is: How long will it be until that name is a misnomer? How long until … Read more…

Canary in the coal mine – birds …

“The canary in the coal mine.” That phrase has become part of the lexicon as a warning for danger. Now birds are cautioning humans about the imminent threat of climate change—and the news is not good. This from a report based on seven years of research by the National Audubon Society. The Common Loonis a … Read more…

Canary in the coal mine – … and bees

Scott Groom, PhD student at Flinders University has engaged mathematical modelling to identify changes in bee populations over the past 20,000 years across the South Pacific region and says that exceptionally large declines in bee populations coincided with changes in temperature, ABC News reports. “They’re almost canaries in the coal mine, you can see that … Read more…

Canary in the coal mine – Bolivia

Bolivia, a canary in the coal mine. Recently, Bolivia has been experiencing the complete portfolio of climate impacts. In the past few years, Bolivia has faced record-breaking mudslides, a deceased glacier, soaring food prices, extreme droughts and frosts, and environmental-induced migration. As one might expect, the impacts Bolivia faces have a causal relationship to the … Read more…

Canary in the coal mine – shellfish growers

Ocean acidification is sometimes called the evil twin of climate change: Both are caused by rising amounts of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. More CO2 dissolved in the water is making it harder for many creatures to form shells. Senator Maria Cantwell (D-Washington) said the rising acidity of the world’s oceans needs to be a … Read more…

Canary in the coal mine – glaciers

Climatologists refer to glaciers as the “canary in the climate change’s coal mine.” Glaciers are one of the first things affected by climate change, and they predict bigger changes in the future. Water and Ice By Jim Ollhoff Abdo Publishing Company, Edina, 2011, p18

Canary in the coal mine – trees

Researchers at Princeton University recently took a deep dive into the lovely autumnal colors of the Northeast and Midwest with an eye on climate change. They found that as the planet heats up, fall foliage will respond in messy, unpredictable ways — and that as a whole, leaves will begin changing color later and the … Read more…

Canary in the coal mine – agriculture

Agriculture — A Canary in the Coal Mine for Climate Change. An often overlooked culprit, the agricultural sector accounts for fourteen per cent — or as much as twenty-five per cent if you include agriculture-driven deforestation — of global greenhouse gas emissions. At the same time, agriculture may be one of the greatest tools we … Read more…

Canary in the coal mine – Inuit

While this drama may seen remote and unimportant to those who defend what they believe to be their God-given right to burn fossil fuels, what befalls the Inuit may soon befall all of us. In simple terms, they are the canaries in the coal mine of climate change. This was the profoundly moving message that … Read more…

Canary in the coal mine – penguins

But for Dee Boersma, a biology professor at University of Washington, Turbo and the 200,000 other Magellanic penguins from the Punta Tombo colony on the Atlantic coast of Argentina are far more than new friends. They have become the canaries in the global warming “coal mine,” signalling the effects of climate change on oceans through … Read more…

Canary in the coal mine – African communities

There were many representatives for those with no voice, for example small African communities and people in the Torres Strait, who are experiencing difficulty growing crops, fresh water supplies, and collapsing sea walls. These are the canaries in the coal mine. What is happening to them now is actually affecting the richer nations now, but … Read more…

Canary in the coal mine – Bering Sea

In recent years, scientists have directed their attention to the impacts of climate change in the Bering Sea’s ecosystem, which is considered by scientists “a canary in a coal mine” because it appears to be showing climate change effects before the rest of the ocean. Although it is “a good start” that people begin to … Read more…