black-capped chickadees turn up their noses

In yet another example of the far-reaching impact of global warming, a University of Rhode Island student found evidence that suggests some songbirds may avoid eating insects that consume leaves exposed to high levels of carbon dioxide.

URI senior Martina Miller of Kingston, working in cooperation with Associate Professor Scott McWilliams, Ph.D. candidate David Podlesak and colleagues at the University of Wisconsin, studied the food preferences exhibited by black-capped chickadees.

“It was clear that the birds could tell the difference between the different caterpillars and they had strong preferences,” Miller said. “They’re intelligent birds with a keen capacity to learn.” medical news today, 27 Jan 2004