prepare to meet thy doom!

The Hawaii team, led by biologist and geographer Camilo Mora, took an alternate approach—they assumed, in the absence of a global mitigation agreement, greenhouse gas levels will keep rising at a steady rate, and used climate models to track how long it would take for weather events that are currently thought of as extreme to become typical.

“The results shocked us. Regardless of the scenario, changes will be coming soon,” Mora said in a press statement. “Within my generation, whatever climate we were used to will be a thing of the past.” For all locations on Earth, the average year of departure is 2047, but for some places concentrated in the tropics, that date will come much sooner, in the 2030?s, or in some extreme cases, the 2020?s.

In just a few decades, in other words, the coldest day you experience in January will be hotter than the warmest days your parents had in January—and the hottest day you get in July (in the Northern hemisphere) will simply be hotter than any day anyone has ever felt in your city to date.
Smithsonian.com 9 Oct 2013

ice free planet

The world could be tracking towards irreversible climate change as warming takes place much quicker than previously thought, an Adelaide academic has warned. Climate change expert Barry Brook, of Adelaide University, told a Canberra conference — Imagining the Real Life on a Greenhouse Earth — atmospheric carbon dioxide levels were headed towards 600 parts a million, and forecast global temperature increases of up to six degrees.

Professor Brook said a global temperature increase of three degrees might result in the collapse of the Amazon rainforest, a four-degree increase would lead to the displacement of hundreds of million of people and the extinction of up to half the world’s species, and a five-degree increase would create an ice-free planet and sea-level increases of 80 metres.
The Age, 12 Jun 2008

going, … going ….

canstockphoto20049549

Famous global landmarks including the Statue of Liberty, Tower of London and Sydney Opera House will be lost to rising seas caused by climate change, scientists have warned.

“It’s relatively safe to say that we will see the first impacts at these sites in the 21st century,” lead author Prof Ben Marzeoin, of the University of Innsbruck in Austria, told the Guardian. “Typically when people talk about climate change it’s about the economic or environmental consequences, how much it’s goin to cost. We wanted to look at the cultural implications.”

The Guardian 5 Mar 2014

(c) Can Stock Photo

bleak future

pyramids_underwater

In 600 pages, Sir Nicholas Stern spells out a bleak future gripped by violent storms, rising sea levels, crippling droughts and economic chaos unless urgent action is taken to tackle global warming. Rising sea levels will threaten countries like Bangladesh but also some of the biggest cities, including London, New York, Tokyo and Shanghai.

Ocean acidification could destroy fish stocks, crop failure will leave hundreds of millions at risk of starvation and up to 200 million people will be displaced by rising sea levels, floods and drought. It is already too late to avoid many of the problems facing people in the Third World.

The Telegraph, 31 Oct 2006

rare coffee

Coffee lovers may want to get that caffeine fix before the treasured drink becomes a rare export.

Starbucks raised the issue last year when the company’s director of sustainability told The Guardian that climate change is threatening the supply chain for the Arabica coffee bean.

Starbucks Sustainability Director Jim Hanna told the paper, “What we are really seeing as a company as we look 10, 20, 30 years down the road – if conditions continue as they are – is a potentially significant risk to our supply chain, which is the Arabica coffee bean.”

Huffington Post, 2001

new sufferers

Climate change may be triggering a surge in cases of asthma and hay fever, according to a report by the world’s leading scientists. \
Earlier springs, increased pollen production by plants and the spread of pollen-producing species could be causing allergic attacks in people who have never before suffered from hay fever.

The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) is warning that the problems for the allergic could increase as temperatures rise.

The Sunday Times (UK), 13 May 2007

stay at home bees

According to the USDA, bee populations are dropping nationwide. Wetter winters and rainy summers make it harder for bees to get out and about to collect, leaving them to starve or become malnourished and more prone to other diseases.

This doesn’t just mean a decline in honey. We rely on bees to pollinate crops. When bees disappear, many food crops could also die off.

 

our only hope – give them more money!

Climate change could cause global conflicts as large as the two world wars but lasting for centuries unless the problem is controlled, a leading defence think tank has warned.

The Royal United Services Institute said a tenfold increase in research spending, comparable to the amount spent on the Apollo space programme, will be needed if the world is to avoid the worst effects of changing temperatures.
The Telegraph (UK) 23 Apr 2008

apocalypse soon! … unless we stop sending Xmas cards

Xmas_cardsIn his most apocalyptic predictions in recent years, Dr Rowan Williams claimed that the Earth is now facing a “whole range of ‘doomsday’ prospects” from climate change to the destruction of delicate ecosystems and even attack from “bio-terror” weapons.

The Church of England has been at the forefront of efforts to encourage “green” behaviour in recent years, even suggesting recently that people should post fewer Christmas cards.

The archbishop went on: “In the doomsday scenarios we are so often invited to contemplate, the ultimate tragedy is that a material world capable of being a manifestation in human hands of divine love is left to itself, as humanity is gradually choked, drowned or starved by its own stupidity.”
The Telegraph, 16 Mar 2009

pollutants

Melting glaciers and ice sheets are releasing cancer-causing pollutants into the air and oceans, scientists say. The long-lasting chemicals get into the food chain and build up in people’s bodies – triggering tumours, heart disease and infertility. The warning comes in new international study into the links between climate change and a class of man-made toxins called persistent organic pollutants.
Daily Mail (UK), 9 Dec 2010

new planet!

new_planetOur children and grandchildren will live on a “fundamentally different planet” by the end of this century unless people all over the world convince their governments and industries to stop global warming, warned Dr Michael Mann, one of the nation’s leading experts on climate change.

How will the Earth be different in just 87 years? Mann predicted record heat waves, record crop destroying droughts, recrd wildfires – and not just in the West. Expanding deserts, storms producing more floodng, rising ocean levels, And more diseases because fewer frosts will kill disease carrying mosquitoes and ticks.
WFMZ-TV News, 1 May 2013. “Dr Mann warns global warming will create a fundamentally different planet”

more wildfires

With droughts and wildfires hitting many parts of the U.S., municipalities from Colorado to Tennessee canceled July 4th public fireworks displays or banned personal fireworks this year, citing the fire hazards they posed.

In June, a study published in the journal Ecosphere found that almost all of North America will see more wildfires by 2100, reported Reuters.

The study’s lead author, Max Moritz, said, “In the long run, we found what most fear – increasing fire activity across large areas of the planet.”/div> Huffington Post, 2001

no more reef

The Great Barrier Reef could be dead in 20 years unless there is a drastic reduction in greenhouse gas emissions, a marine biology expert said on Friday.

Rising sea temperatures were bleaching the coral and causing it to die, said Professor Ove Hoegh-Guldberg of the Australian Research Council for Excellence for Coral Reek Studies.

At the same time, increasing levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere were turning the world’s oceans more acidic and preventing corals form forming their limestone skeletons, he said.

Sydney Morning Herald, 6 Apr 2007

male birds rule the roost

Male birds rule the roost.

By and large there are one third more male birds out there than females, according to a new study by Paul Donald of the UK Royal Society for the Protection of Birds.

This is despite the fact that as many hatchlings of each sex born. So the researchers conclude that unlike humans, female birds must have shorter life expectancies than males.

The finding is bad news for conservation efforts, which often estimate the size of populations by counting the number of males – it seems threatened birds might be even more thin on the ground than previously thought.

Strikingly, the researchers also found that the sex ratio was even greater in threatened species.

New Scientist, 31 Aug 2007

crossroads!

crossroads

World Environment Day has been celebrated in Brisbane with a call for a massive turn to renewable energy and the large-scale subsidy of public transport to aid in the battle against global warming. Brisbane co-convenor Paul Benedek said 2007 was a watershed year for the environment.

“The world is at a crossroads; if we keep going the way we are going, we think the climate change that is occurring will be catastrophic.”

“We have rising seas, catastrophic weather events that are happening – you only have to look down at NSW – lives and species are threatened, look at what is happening at the poles, the ice melting. We think it is absolutely urgent and we are calling for a massive turn to renewable energy.”
The Age, 9 Jun 2007

look out below!

falling_rocks
A vast chunk of Europe’s most ill-famed mountain threatens to break loose and crash down in the next few days, a geologist monitoring the situation told the Guardian on Friday.

Hans-Rudolf Keusen said 2m cubic metres of the Eiger in the Bernese Alps, Switzerland – twice the volume of the Empire State Building – was rapidly working its way loose. He said the mountain appeared to have cracked open as an indirect result of global warming.
The Guardian, 8/7/06

sinking …. sinking ….

house_underwater_2
Up to a quarter of a million homes around the country, vital power stations, ports, sewerage pipes, water supplies and transport hubs, including Sydney airport, are at serious risk of flooding as a result of sea-level rise and bigger storm tides caused by climate change, warns the Rudd Government’s first national assessment of the coastline…

The report draws on scientific experts from the CSIRO, GeoScience Australia, the University of Tasmania and the Department of Climate Change. At risk by 2100, 157,000 to 247,000 homes, 170 industrial zones, 1800 bridges, 120 ports, 360 schools colleges and universities, 102 retirement/nursing homes, 258 police, fire and ambullance stations and 75 hospitals and health centres.
Sydney Morning Herald/ Environment, 14 Nov 2009. “Flood warning: lucky they brought a paddle”

delete winter!

Winter has gone for ever and we should officially bring spring forward instead, one of the country’s most respected gardeners said yesterday. “Over the last 12 months there has been no winter,” said Dr Nigel Taylor, curator of Kew Gardens. “Last year was extraordinary. Spring was in January, April was summer, the summer was cool, then it was warmer and sunny in autumn.”

“There is no winter any more despite a cold snap before Christmas. It is nothing like years ago when I was younger. There is a real problem with spring because so much is flowering so early year to year.” Express, 8 Feb 2008

run, run reindeer

Reindeer, also known as “caribou” in North America, could face a difficult future in a warmer climate.

According to U.S. News & World Report, “Russell Graham, associate professor of geosciences and director of the Earth and Mineral Sciences Museum at Penn State University, says global warming will most harm the animals adapted to the coldest environments, primarily those accustomed to life in the Arctic.

A 2008 study found that caribou in West Greenland are “now arriving after peak foraging time, fewer calves are being born and more calves are dying,” reported ScienceNews.

Huffington Post, 2001

cedars at risk

Earlier this year, researchers from the U.S. Forest Service confirmed that climate warming is killing southeast Alaska’s mighty yellow cedars.

The study, published in the journal Bioscience, found that with decreasing snow cover, the trees’ shallow roots are more vulnerable to freezing, reported AP. Paul Schaberg, a U.S. Forest Service plant pathologist, said,

“As time goes on and climates change even more, other species, other locations, are likely to experience similar kinds of progressions, so you might do well to understand this one so you can address those future things.”

Huffington Post, 2001

whiter clouds

Researchers at the University of Edinburgh have published a proposal to whiten clouds by using remote-controlled sailing ships to spray a mist of seawater high into the air.

Whiter clouds would reflect more heat away from the Earth.

But vast new fleets of ships would be required to carry out the task on a big enough scale, and it would be vulnerable to local changes in weather.

Sydney Morning Herald, 9 Dec 2012

it’s all in the timing

U.N. Panel Issues Its Starkest Warning Yet on Global Warming.

Failure to reduce emissions, the group of scientists and other experts found, could threaten society with food shortages, refugee crises, the flooding of major cities and entire island nations, mass extinction of plants and animals, and a climate so drastically altered it might become dangerous for people to work or play outside during the hottest times of the year.

The new report comes just a month before international delegates convene in Lima, Peru, to devise a new global agreement to limit emissions, and it makes clear the urgency of their task.
New York Times, 2 Nov 2014

all is lost!

A climate change report has painted an alarming picture of the effect on Australia if global temperatures increase by more than an average three degrees Celsius.

Under that scenario, heat-related deaths would triple, people would be displaced en masse from the coast and national icons like the Great Barrier Reef would almost certainly be lost, according to the analysis by the former head of the CSIRO’s Climate Impacts Group.

The frequency of bushfires would double and there would be major extinctions of animal and plant life, Dr Barrie Pittock says in the report commissioned by WWF Australia.

On an even more serious note, such a rise in temperature would almost certainly trigger an unstoppable climate tipping point – which may occur with a global warming of two to three degrees Celsius, Dr Pittock said.
The Age, 27 Sep 2007

hot under the collar

man_hitting_computerA new research has shown that as the earth’s average temperature rises, so does human “heat” in the form of violent tendencies, which links global warming with increased violence in human beings.

While the global warming science has recently come under fire, the main premise behind the Iowa State researchers’ research paper is irrefutable. “It is very well researched and what I call the ‘heat hypothesis’,” a spokesman said.
dna India, 20/3/10

a hell of a climate

humorous_devilBillions will die, says Lovelock, who tells us that he is not normally a gloomy type. Human civilisation will be reduced to a “broken rabble ruled by brutal warlords”, and the plague-ridden remainder of the species will flee the cracked and broken earth to the Arctic, the last temperate spot, where a few breeding couples will survive.

It is going to be a “hell of a climate”, he says, with Europe 8C warmer than it is today; and the real killer, says Lovelock, is that there is not a damn thing we can do about it. We are already pumping out so much carbon dioxide, with no prospect of abatement from the growing economies of China and India, that our fate is sealed.
The Telegraph (UK),2 Feb 2006

public health

For about 40 million Americans, spring also means sneezing and congestion, a box of tissues, and a trip to the doctor. Unfortunately, for these hay fever sufferers, the suffering will likely get worse.

Researchers have found that changes in climate impose additional strains on those with pollen allergies.

So, what does this mean for public health?

“The influence of climate change on plant behavior exacerbates or adds an additional factor to the number of people suffering from allergy and asthma,” Lewis Ziska, Ph.D., a weed ecologist at the Agriculture Research Service division of the U.S. Department of Agriculture, said.

The intersection of climate change and health is something that epidemiologists are just beginning to analyze closely, he added.

Union of concerned scientists, A Changing Climate Worsens Allergy Symptoms

greatest challenge

The number and severity of catastrophes such as the June long weekend storm are expected to rise significantly over the next decade, because of climate change.

Leading global insurer Allianz SE, based in Munich, made the predictions in a report, Hedging Climate Change, which was made public in Sydney on Tuesday.

Allianz management board member Clement Booth said climate change was one of the greatest challenges that humankind faced.

Allianz’s report said the number of natural catastrophes had gone from an average of 30 to 40 per year in the 1970s to 120 to 140 a year since the 1990s.

It said most of these were either related, suggesting a connection between increases in natural catastrophes and rising global temperatures as a result of climate change.

Newcastle Herald, 20 Sep 2007 – image held by this website

be slim and save the planet!

The World Health Organisation recently published some data showing that each overweight person causes an additional one tonne of CO2 to be emitted every year, said Sir Jonathan Porritt, the Government’s chief green adviser.

“With one billion people judged to be overweight around the world – of whom at least 300 million are obese – that’s an additional one billion tonnes.”

The Telegraph UK 3 Jun 2009