happy workers

We started to think about . . . the things . . . we do economically which have alignment with sustainable outcomes. One is the environment and one is safety, Mr Hawker said. IAG employees started to print on both sides of paper, recycle paper, use the internet to read information rather than printing documents, and the number of documents in branches was slashed from 52 to 4.

In addition to helping the environment, Mr Hawker said employees were happier than ever.
Sydney Morning Herald, 27/9/03

china cups lead the fight against climate change!

Church of England bishops should abandon their draughty historic palaces and gas-guzzling cars to counter global warming, one of the world’s most eminent climate scientists said yesterday.

Sir John Houghton, the former chief executive of the Met Office and the first chairman of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, said that the Church was breaking the Ten Commandments if it failed to take a moral lead.

His call to church leaders came as the Christian development agency, Tearfund, published guidleines for churches on how to be more green. They included installing wind turbines and solar panels on homes, and using china rather than plastic cups for after-church coffee. The Telegraph (UK) 3 Feb 2007

concrete proposal

The Royal Horticultural Society has launched a campaign to encourage home owners to think twice about paving over their front gardens. Replacing foliage with hard surfaces prevents rainwater soaking into the ground and increases the risk of flash flooding.

As global warming becomes more of a problem, gardens are necessary to absorb heat, paricularly in densely populated areas, the RHS said.
The Telegraph (UK), 16 Feb 2007

girl power

More than half of Sunday Age readers support the introduction of an emissions trading scheme regardless of whether other countries follow suit.

Views of readers on emissions trading and climate change were canvassed in a poll that also revealed a significant gender divide over environmental issues.

Female readers are more likely to conserve water, recycle waste and support Australia going it alone on carbon emissions trading than their male counterparts.

They are also more inclined than men to take shorter showers, buy local produce and restrict garden watering for the sake of the environment.

But four times as many men as women support the introduction of nuclear power to helped cut carbon emissions.

Sydney Morning Herald, 11 Oct 2009

fat chance

Professor David Raubenheimer, a nutritional ecologist at the University of Sydney’s Charles Perkins Centre, believes that the worldwide obesity pandemic is caused by climate change and a low consumption of protein.

Sydney Morhing Herald 8 Dec 2014 – screencopy held by this website

pipe dreams?

Today James Lovelock, of Green College, Oxford University, outlines an emergency way to stimulate the Earth to cure itself with Chris Rapley, former head of the British Antarctic Survey who is now the director of the Science Museum, London.

They propose that vertical pipes some 10 metres across be placed in the ocean, such that wave motion would pump up cool water from 100-200 metres depth to the surface, moving nutrient-rich waters in the depths to mix with the relatively barren warm waters at the ocean surface.

This would fertilise algae in the surface waters and encourage them to bloom, absorbing carbon dioxide greenhouse gas while also releasing a chemical called dimethyl sulphide that is know to seed sunlight reflecting clouds.

One version of the scheme sees around 10,000 pipes in the Gulf of Mexico, they told The Daily Telegraph.The Telegraph (UK), 26 Sep 2007

hero of the global warming movement!

Meet David Keith. He’s a professor of physics and public policy at Harvard University. He’s a Canadian who won Canada’s national physics prize exam and who Time Magazine named one of their Heroes of the Environment in 2009. Keith sounds like — must be — a rational guy with credentials like that, right? But consider Keith’s plan to tackle climate change.

He wants to send two jets 20 kilometres up above the Earth’s surface to spray a fine layer of sulfuric acid, approximately one million tons of it, blanketing the global atmosphere.

According to an article on Smithsonian.com, which recently featured Keith, that layer of sulfuric acid would be enough to reflect back one per cent of the sun’s rays, deflecting radiation and lowering the global temperature.

The Smithsonian celebrated Keith in mid-May at its third annual The Future is Here Festival.
National Observer, 20 May 2015

thanks to Andrew Mark Harding

slow boat to ….?

In 2007, Peter Flynn, the Poole Chair in Management for Engineers at the University of Alberta in Edmonton, Alberta, devised a US$50-billion contingency plan involving 8,000 barges that would manipulate the Atlantic conveyor, the currents of water which help ensure Northern Europe’s mild climate.

Flynn’s army of barges would maintain that mild climate in the face of global warming changing the currents and causing a deep freeze to fall over Northern Europe. The barges would float into position every fall, spraying water into the air to form ice and then pumping salt water over top and trapping it in the ice.

Come the spring, the barges would pour more water over the ice, melting it and creating a vast amount of cold, salt water that would sink, adding to and strengthening the deep current.
National Observer, 20 May 2015

thanks to Andrew Mark Harding

an outsized carbon paw print

Enlightened animal lovers across the United States face a quandary: how to pamper beloved pets without adding to global warming or creating an outsized carbon paw print?

Answers for the ecologically-aware pet owner were on offer at the Going Green With Pets conference at Manhattan’s tony Metropolitan Dog Club, with pointers on everything from whipping up biodegradable cat litter to choosing the best organic shampoo for one’s Lhasa Apso.

The must-read primer for the environmentally aware pet owner is Eco-Dog, published in March and already in its second printing. The book is a how-to on making Fido a meal consisting of just rice and beans or how to convert a faded pair of blue jeans into a dog bed.The Age (Australia), 26 Jun 2008

lose the flakes

Dandruff and dog fur may be more than embarrassing inconveniences: they could be changing the world’s climate, new research shows.

Dead skin, animal hair and other materials, such as bacteria, fungi, algae, viruses, plant cells and pollens, have been found to make up a larger part of “aerosol” air pollution than was thought.

By counting and identifying cells in air samples from around the world, a German researcher, Ruprecht Jaenicke, showed that about 25 per cent of atmospheric particles came from these sources in some places.

Atmospheric aerosols play a crucial role in regulating the global climate, and the meteorological relevance of cellular particles could be high, said Dr Jaenicke, of the University of Mainz, whose results were published yesterday in the journal Science.

Sydney Morning Herald, 2 Apr 2005

red helicopter

Melburnians believed their 13-year water crisis – with its withering parks and gardens, dying trees, and the end of carefree water use – was as severe as facing a war or major natural disaster.

Documents reveal the Government’s thinking behind the so-called “red helicopter” advertisements, which featured a chopper-borne Steve Bracks (premier of Victoria – admin)announcing the controversial desalination plant.

Shannon’s Way’s (government’s advertising agency – admin) pitch to the Government was centred on the reassurance and leadership of Mr Bracks, underlying that he has been “correct all along”.

The pitch also said the advertisement should highlight that announcements were “just part of the plan on water”. The helicopter, Shannon’s Way said, was important because of the “vibrant nature of the sound – loud, fast and full. And like the film Apocalypse Now, we can use … the intense sound of a helicopter at full throttle.”

Sydney Morning Herald, 11 Oct 2009

don’t leave home without it!

A limit could be imposed on the carbon each person pumps into the atmosphere under proposals being considered by the Government to combat global warming.

A credit card-style trading system would ensure that people pay for air travel, electricity, gas and petrol with carbon rations as well as cash, under the plans to be floated today by David Miliband, the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs in a speech to the Audit Commission. The Independent, 19/7/06

wow, I’m worth 30,000 pounds!

A lower birth rate would help cut greenhouse gas emissions, a report released today claims. Each Briton uses nearly 750 tonnes of CO2 in a lifetime, equivalent to 620 return flights between London and New York, the Optimum Population Trust warns.

Based on a cost of 42.50 pounds per tonne of CO2, the report estimates that the price for the climate of each new person over their lifetime is roughly 30,000 pounds. The bill for the extra 10 million people projected for the UK by 2074 would reach more than 300 billion pounds.

The report, called A Population-Based Climate Strategy, says: ”The most effective personal climate change strategy is limiting the number of children one has. The most effective national and global climate change strategy is limiting the size of the population.”
The Telegraph (UK), 7 May 2007

a holiday used to be just a holiday

The man who inspired a generation of backpackers to see the world has claimed that travelling is environmentally destructive. Mark Ellingham, the founder the Rough Guide series of books, is urging holidaymakers to cut down on foreign flights.

He wants to stop the trend for “binge flying” and is calling for green taxes on overseas plane trips. He added:”Balancing all the positives and negatives, I’m not convinced there is such a thing as a ‘responsible’ or ‘ethical’ holiday.”

The Telegraph (UK), 7 May 2007

murky water

Warmer temperatures are expected to cause more colored organic matter to run off into lakes, turning the water brown.

That will kill the plants at the bottom of the lakes, as they need sunlight to survive.

That means that the animal species which eat those plants will have to find something else to feed them, which will cause significant drop of their number.

Greenbuzz, 2 Jul 2011

more bugs

Bad news for allergy sufferers — climate change, and specifically warmer temperatures, may bring more pollen and ragweed, according to a 2011 study from the Mount Sinai School of Medicine in New York.

Along with allergies, a changing climate may be tied to more infectious diseases. According to one study, climate change could affect wild bird migratory patterns, increasing the chances for human flu pandemics.

Illnesses like Lyme disease could also become more prominent.

Huffington Post, 11 Aug 2012 What Climate Change Just Might Ruin

CO2 scrubber

A group of scientists are devising a ‘CO2 scrubber’ which they claim will capture one tonne of CO2 from the air every day, about the same per passenger as a flight from London to New York, reducing the warming effect of greenhouse gases produced each year.

The ‘scrubber’ devices – small enough to fit inside a shipping container – would need to be produced in their millions to soak up human carbon emissions, and the CO2 trapped would still need to be disposed of. The prototype will cost about £100,000 and take about two years to construct at a laboratory in Tucson, Arizona.
The Telegraph (UK), 1 Jun 2008

paying people to eat

Lord Stern, the former government advisor on climate change, yesterday predicted that a mechanism would be established to “pay the poor to eat” as part of efforts to cope with global warming. Increases in prices of food staples sparked riots on three continents in recent weeks and have in part been blamed on the effects of global warming.

Lord Stern’s 2006 report on the economic impact of climate change provided an apocalyptic view of a warming planet. At an energy industry summit yesterday the former head of the government economic service said he would be even more pessimistic if he was writing his report today. He said: “I was too reticent.”
The Telegraph (UK), 17 Apr 2008

Britain’s finest minds put their noses to the grindstone

Britain’s finest scientific minds have turned their attention to a problem that they claim is threatening the future of the planet – farm animal flatulence.

Experts at the Rrowett Research Institute in Aberdeen say the average cow contributes as much to global warming as a family car that travels 12,ooo miles. The scientists are now trying to produce new foodstuffs that result in livestock producing less methane.The Telegraph (UK), 20 Mar 2008

insect taxi service

Now a new study by Durham University shows human beings could help by transporting the insects to cooler climes in the south. The researchers caught the Marbled White and Small Skipper butterflies in North Yorkshire and transported them in soft cages to safe areas in County Durham and Northumberland.

Eight years later the research, published in Conservation Letters, showed both species thriving in their new home. Professor Brian Huntley from Durham University said other species at risk of climate change could also be moved. The Telegraph (UK), 18 Feb 2009

not all bad news

A colony of Antarctic penguins could be excused for feeling like climate change’s big winners.

A study has found a group of Adelie penguins on Beaufort Island in the Ross Sea, 3500km south of New Zealand, has significantly boosted its numbers as nearby glaciers have receded.

A team of US and New Zealand-based scientists has used aerial photographs from as far back as 1958 and modern satellite imagery to measure nesting areas and population.

Population size varied with available habitat, and both increased rapidly since the mid-1980s, the team found.

Numbers in the colony increased by 84 per cent as habitat grew by 71 per cent.

The Age, 4 Apr 2013

turtles go the distance

Turtles go the distance. Female loggerhead turtles in Florida, US, increasingly rely on long-distance relationships with males in North Carolina, according to research our of the University of Exeter in the UK.

That’s because the sex of the loggerhead hatchlings is determined by the temperature at which the egg is incubated: warmer temperatures yield females, cooler ones yield males.

So warming temperatures in the US mean that southern populations of loggerheads are increasingly dominated by females.

New Scientist, 31 Aug 2007

dog day afternoons

Leading pet behaviourists told The Independent that the number of depressed and unsettled dogs they have seen in recent months is unprecedented. And they suggested that the spate of wet winters could be at the root of the problem, as owners cut down on the daily walks that are crucial to keeping dogs’ spirits up.

“I’ve been working with dogs for more than 20 years and I can’t remember a time when they’ve been this bored. I tend to see boredom in bursts but I’m seeing it chronically this winter,” said Carolyn Menteith, a dog behaviourist who was named Britain’s Instructor of the Year in 2015.

She – like many scientists and meteorologists – puts this down to climate change and expects to see more bored dogs in the future as global warming unleashes increasingly frequent and intense bouts of winter rainfall.
The Independent, 5 Feb 2016

thanks to ddh

like cats on a hot tin roof

When Kristina Vesk started working at the Cat Protection Society of NSW in 2006, she rarely saw kittens in winter. Now warmer weather means cats are breeding all year round, increasing the numbers of unwanted kittens and the threat to native wildlife from strays and feral cats.

Ms Vesk, the society’s chief executive, said there used to be weeks from June to September when the shelter saw very few, if any, kittens. But with the climate changing and temperatures rising, it seems cats are increasingly on heat.

“For the past three years, I don’t think we’ve experienced a full week at any time of year where we don’t have at least a couple of kittens in our care,” Ms Vesk said. “Kitten ‘season’ has grown longer and longer as we keep having … enough warm and sunny days in winter that make cats think it’s a good time to start breeding.”
Sydney Morning Herald, 8 Feb 2016

thanks to ddh