never smile at a ….

Rising temperatures could force the birth of more female crocodiles and fewer males, an expert said today. The scenario could cause some croc populations to disappear.

Crocodile gender is determined by temperature during incubation. Nest temperatures of 89.6 to 91.4 degrees Fahrenheit (32-33 Celsius) result in males. Anything warmer or cooler produces females.

Temperatures typically vary from the top of a nest to the bottom, producing both genders.

LiveScience, 27 Nov 2006

poisoned fish

Known as ciguatera fish poisoning, the illness has been mostly tropical.

The higher risk tends to be the predatory species that eat herbivorous fish, said Christopher Bolsh, senior lecturer at the University of Tasmania’s Institute for Marine & Antarctic Studies.

“Ciguatera is probably the most serious human seafood poisoning issue.”

“Again, climate change appears to be playing a role. Microalgae thrive as waters warm but also as corals die off – an outcome triggered by more intense storms but also from coral bleaching,” Dr Murray, from the University of Technology, Sydney, said.

Sydney Morning Herald, 22 Dec 2014

how do you like them …

Global warming is causing apples to lose some of their crunch, but it is also making them sweeter, a study has said.

Analysing data gathered from 1970 to 2010 at two orchards in Japan, a research team said on Thursday there was clear evidence that climate change was having an effect on apple taste and texture.

“All such changes may have resulted from earlier blooming and higher temperatures during growth season”, they wrote in the journal Nature Scientific Reports.

Illawarra Mercury, 17 Aug 2013 – screencopy held by this website

fish going south

The wild barramundi may be forced to flee further south due to warmer waters, according to new research by Queensland government climate scientists.

Natural Resources Minister Craig Wallace said researchers from the Queensland Climate Change Centre of Excellence had found projected rises in sea water temperatures due to global warming may decrease the numbers of fish in the state.

The Age, 26Jun 2007

feeling blue

Frustrated green scientists and environmental activists may be at a high risk of depression.

Susie Burke, a senior psychologist with the Australian Psychological Society, has done extensive work on the mental impact of climate change.

“We can be very sure that many people in the field of climate change are distressed – highly distressed – and it can have a significant psychosocial impact on their well-being,” Burke said.

“If you’re feeling stress, anger, guilt, anxiousness or hopelessness, it has effects on your life. Depression becomes a real risk.”

The Age, 14 Aug 2014

bushfire alert

Unless action is taken now to reduce carbon dioxide emissions, Australia will be unable to manage future catastrophic bushfires, leading climate scientists have warned.

The co-director of the University of NSW’s climate change research centre, Andy Pitman, says there will be a 100 to 200 per cent increase in bushfire risk by 2100 if Australia continues on its path of high emissions.

But if Australia was able to meet the low emission guidelines set by the inter-governmental panel on climate change, the increase in bushfire risk would be just 20 to 30 per cent by 2100, he said.

The Age, 31 May 2007

see also – just plain scary

Ice Age revisited

Sweden’s mountains are growing greener. At the border between woods and bare mountain, trees that require warm temperatures, such as oak, elm, maple, and black alder, have become established for the first time in 8,000 years.

This is shown in current studies led by Leif Kullman, professor of physical geography at Umeå University in Sweden.

Over the last century, the temperature has risen by more than one degree. The cooling trend over several thousand years is broken, and this has triggered changes in flora, fauna, and landscapes.

In important respects, the present state is similar to what occurred directly after the latest ice age.

Science Daily, 18/5/08

swarms

Scientists say global warming could be about to boost fly populations in the world’s cooler nations, bringing swarms of blowflies to countries like England.

Researchers from Southampton University used computer models to analyse how a rise in tempterature could affect populations of houseflies and bluebottles, the British name for blowflies.

Based on the data, they estimated that Britains’s fly numbers could rise by 250 per cent by 2080.

Sun Herald (Australia), 16 Oct 2005 – screencopy held by this website

Squirrels beat the heat

Canadian squirrels have evolved earlier breeding times.

Squirrels with genes for earlier breeding were probably favored because this allows them to take advantage of an earlier spring and hoard more pinecones for winter survival

…..as the climate has warmed in recent decades, Canadian squirrels have evolved shifts in their breeding times that make them more successful in warmer climates.

Berkeley University: Understanding Evolution, May 2009

pestilence

According to several leading climate scientists and public health researchers, global warming will lead to higher incidence and more intense versions of disease.

The direct or indirect effects of global warming might intensify the prevalence of tuberculosis, HIV/AIDS, dengue and Lyme disease, they said, but the threat of increased health risks is likely to futher motivate the public to combat global warming.

“The environmental changes wrought by global warming will undoubtedly result in major ecologic changes that will alter patterns and intensity of some infectious diseases,” said Gerald Friedland, professor of medicine and epidemiology and public health at the Yale School of Medicine.

Yale News, 11 Apr 2012

see also – just plain scary

bio-degradable footwear

The uncomfortable truth is that overconsumption is a major factor in climate change, Jo Paoletti, an associate professor of American Studies at the University of Maryland says. “We buy much more clothing today than we did a generation ago, and too much of it is ‘ast,’ disposable fashion.”

If we define ‘sustainable fashion’ as made of particular [eco-friendly] fibers but still ready for Goodwill in a few months, we are deluding ourselves,” says Jo Paoletti.

There’s good news: several companies are already stepping up to contribute to the industry’s sustainability and to work toward lessening its environmental impact, as Politiwicz points out.

Puma, for example, is manufacturing biodegradable footwear. Levi’s recently launched an initiative to use less water in its jeans manufacturing process. Even fast fashion behemoth H&M has launched its own Conscious Collection sustainability initiative.

Huffington Post 11 Aug 2012 What Climate Change Just Might Ruin