invasion – box jellyfish

Deadly box jellyfish and other tropical marine species could invade the Hunter’s coastal waters over the next 20 years due to climate change, a CSIRO marine ecologist has predicted. Marine life changes are also likely to have a major impact on commercial fishing and tourism.

Dr Alistair Hobday said CSIRO data showed water temperatures off the Australian east coast had already increased by two degrees over the past 20 years. A similar increase was likely to occur by 2030. As a result, a number of marine species including box jellyfish typically found in warmer Queensland would migrate south.

Warmer water fish species likely to move south include bigeye tuna, bronze whale sharks, striped marlin and sand flathead, Dr Hobday said. Newcastle Herald, 27 Aug 2007 – screencopy held by this website

mind your step!

An invasion of jellyfish plaguing holiday-makers in the Mediterranean has been put down to global warming, with the hot dry weather bringing the creatures closer to the shore.

But this summer’s dry, hot weather experienced throughout Europe increased the salinity of coastal waters as well as its temperature, scientists from the marine conservation NGO Oceana said.

With low-flowing rivers bringing in less freshwater, the natural barrier that keeps jellyfish at bay broke down, they said.

edie.net, 11 Aug 2006

attack of the cannibalistic lobsters!

lobsterThe waters off the coast of Maine are overflowing with lobsters, which, according to Mother Jones, is actually a bad thing.

Two main factors are causing the lobster population to explode. First, rising sea temperatures brought on by global warming are encouraging the crustaceans to grow quicker and reproduce more often, says Noah Oppenheim, a marine biology graduate student at the University of Maine.

Second, Oppenheim tells Mother Jones, over-fishing has rid the ocean of the lobster’s natural enemies, which include cod, herring, and other fish.

The result is a lot of lobsters that have nothing eat — which is why, as footage taken by Oppenheim shows, they have resorted to cannibalism. The Week, 24 Jul 2013

invasion – brain eating amoeba!

A deadly “brain-eating” amoeba that lives in freshwater sources may be surviving in more northern areas of the United States thanks to climate change, health experts suggest.

The amoeba normally lives in warmer waters in the southern United States.

But since climate change is generally making summers hotter, the amoeba now seems to be in northern waters, said Dr. Bruce Hirsch, an infectious diseases specialist at North Shore University Hospital in Manhasset, N.Y.

“Climate change may be playing a role,” he said.

Health Day, 24 Jul 2015

invasion – poison ivy

scratching_dog2

Lewis H. Ziska, a research weed ecologist with the U.S. Department of Agriculture, said laboratory and field studies show that poison ivy is advancing with climate change.

“That trend will continue as carbon dioxide levels keep rising from the current average level of about 400 parts per million to 560 ppm or higher in the next 30 to 50 years, with predicted levels reaching 800 ppm by century’s end. Already poison ivy’s growth and potency has doubled since the 1960s, and it could double again once CO2 levels reach the 560 ppm mark,” Mr. Ziska said.

As a result, Americans might have to scratch their way into a climate-altered future.Pittsburgh Post Gazettte, 22 Jul 2013

invasion – shell-crushing king crabs

King crabs may soon become high-level predators in Antarctic marine ecosystems where they haven’t played a role in tens of millions of years, according to a new study led by Florida Institute of Technology.

Lead author Richard Aronson, professor and head of Florida Tech’s Department of Biological Sciences, said the rising temperature of the ocean west of the Antarctic Peninsula — one of the most rapidly warming places on the planet — should make it possible for king crab populations to move to the shallow continental shelf from their current deep-sea habitat within the next several decades.

“Because other creatures on the continental shelf have evolved without shell-crushing predators, if the crabs moved in they could radically restructure the ecosystem,” Aronson said.
Science Daily, 28 Sep 2015

thanks to ddh

invasion – Giant killer hornets

Giant, killer hornets that fly faster than people run are killing dozens and injuring thousands across China and Japan, and climate change is seen as one of the main culprits for the continuing spread of these invasive species.

Due to the warming temperatures, the population of hornets has only grown as milder winters allow more to survive the season. To make matters worse, they are believed to be spreading across Europe rapidly, leaving hundreds of thousands of dead honeybees in their path.
The Progressive, 8 Oct 2013

invasion – tree eating wood beetles

Tree-eating wood beetles are likely to benefit from a warmer climate and reproduce in ever-increasing numbers. In the first conference to be called on pets and climate change, scientists warned that the small heartworm, that kills dogs, cats and foxes, is already on the rise in the UK with more cases appearing in the north of the country and Scotland because of warmer wetter summers.
BBC News 2005

invasion – vampire bats

The increase in global climate temperatures has raised concerns about the vampire bat species travelling from Mexico and South and Central America into the southern and central regions of Texas.

Carin Peterson, training and outreach coordinator of the Office of Environmental Health and Safety, said even if vampire bats are not making their appearance, Austin’s surrounding caves and popular bat attraction, Congress Avenue Bridge, already have their annual bat species.
Climate Progress, 27/3/12

invasion – mosquitoes

A report by the Expert Group on Climate Change on Health predicts that by 2080, much of the south of the UK would be vulnerable to the milder form of malaria plasmodium vivax for up to four months of the year because of the change in weather conditions.

Mosquitoes will thrive in the higher temperatures, and predicted increases in winter rainfall would provide ideal breeding conditions. Areas with salt-marshes like south-east Kent would be the most vulnerable. Global climate change could mean popular tourist destinations like Turkey could have a higher incidence of a more serious form of malaria.
BBC News, 9 Feb 2001

invasion – fatter marmots

A team led by Daniel Blumstein of the University of California, Los Angeles, have been monitoring the yellow-bellied marmots of Colorado’s Upper East river for over three decades. Blumstein recently realised the population had exploded. “It’s boom time in this region,” he says.

So what caused them to put on weight? Blumstein and Ozgul suspect it was the gradual warming of the region linked to climate change. The warming means spring starts earlier, so marmots come out of hibernation earlier, giving them more time to fatten up before the next winter.
New Scientist, 21/7/10

vegetation invasion

Vegetation around the world is on the move, and climate change is the culprit, according to a new analysis of global vegetation shifts led by a University of California, Berkeley, ecologist in collaboration with researchers from the U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service.

In a paper published today in the journal Global Ecology and Biogeography, researchers present evidence that over the past century, vegetation has been gradually moving toward the poles and up mountain slopes, where temperatures are cooler, as well as toward the equator, where rainfall is greater.

“Approximately one billion people now live in areas that are highly to very highly vulnerable to future vegetation shifts,” said Gonzalez. “Ecosystems provide important services to people, so we must reduce the emissions that cause climate change, then adapt to major changes that might occur.”
News Center, Berkeley University, 4/6/10

invasion – kissing bugs

But could those more-dangerous kissing bug species move north as the climate warms? (members of Reduviid family of insects — the so-called kissing bugs because of their habit of biting people around the mouth while they sleep)

“Absolutely,” says Patricia Dorn, an expert on Chagas disease at Loyola University. “We know the bugs are already across the bottom two-thirds of the U.S., so the bugs are here, the parasites are here. Very likely with climate change they will shift further north and the range of some species will extend,” she says.
University of Vermont, 14/3/12

invasion – tigers

In the past few years man and tiger have been confronting each other more and more in the Sunderbans, and for once, it seems that tigers are getting the upper hand. Climate change is a reality in the Sunderbans. Rising sea levels, constant erosion and increasingly salty waters make life in the tangle of islands and mangrove forests harder for animals.
The Guardian, 25 September 2008

birdwatchers excited

A number of southern Europe’s heron species have suddenly arrived in Britain, in an exotic influx which is exciting birdwatchers.

Mark Grantham, a migration expert at the British Trust for Ornithology thought an anticyclone over southern Europe may have influenced the arrival by pushing birds migrating from Africa too far north, but Britain’s milder weather, perhaps influenced by climate change, was probably another factor.
The Independent, 6/6/07

invasion – the agrostis stolonifera threat

But animals aren’t the only threat to the Antarctic ecosystem. Scientists fear that if global warming causes the continent’s climate to thaw out, introduced plant species could take over. One species of grass, agrostis stolonifera, is a particular threat.

Dana Bergstrom, part of the Australian Antarctic Division and head of a research project on alien species in Antarctica, said: “It’s a species that gets everywhere, it’s already on most of the Antarctic islands.” She said that if the species gets a toehold on the continent “it would just create lawns.”

Scribol, Global Warming causes alien invasion in Antarctica

invasion – poison ivy

Another reason to worry about global warming: more and itchier poison ivy. The noxious vine grows faster and bigger as carbon dioxide levels in the atmosphere rise, researchers report Monday. And a CO2-driven vine also produces more of its rash-causing chemical, urushiol, conclude experiments conducted in a forest at Duke University where scientists increased carbon-dioxide levels to those expected in 2050.
NBC News, 30/5/06

invasion – Stingray

A stingray that kills its prey with a giant electric shock has been found off the coast of Britain, it emerged today. Now experts fear shoals of marbled stingray – a relative of the fish that killed Australian crocodile hunter Steve Irwin – will invade Britain this summer due to global warming.
www.mailonsunday.co.uk, 19 Jun 2008

invasion – Floating pennywort, American mink and the Chinese mitten crab

Hundreds of native British animals and plants are being put at risk from an invasion of foreign species that thrive here because of rising global temperatures, the Government said yesterday. The problem is expected to become worse as warmer temperatures encourage the migration of hostile species, which include floating pennywort, American mink and the Chinese mitten crab.
www.telegraph.co.uk/, 28 May 2008

invasion – The non-native sea squirt

While the jellyfish invasion has helped decimate the winter flounder population in Narragansett Bay, the non-native sea squirt may overrun the local oyster and blue mussel communities. ”There is evidence of jellyfish explosions around the world that appear related to the adverse impact of human activities, and those include global warming,” said a representative of the New York City-based Natural Resources Defence Council.
The Boston Globe, 2/7/02.

invasion – Slugs

Britain’s gardens have been invaded by record numbers of slugs because the wet weather has helped them double their population. Dr Richard Meredith of Bayer Crop Science, has been monitoring slug numbers for years. Normally, frosty winters and dry summers keep the slug population down. But global warming has helped provide perfect conditions for them to thrive.
www.telegraph.co.uk, 22 Aug 2007

invasion – Cats and kittens

Droves of cats and kittens are swarming into animal shelters nationwide, and global warming is to blame, according to one pet adoption group, Pets Across America. The cause of this feline flood is an extended cat breeding season thanks to the world’s warming temperatures, according to the group.
www.livescience.com, 6 Jun 2007

invasion -Asian tiger mosquito

Experts working for the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Defra) have identified 9 alien species on the verge of invading Britain. The experts are most concerned about is the Asian tiger mosquito which is larger than most – up to 1cm long – and bites in the day, rather than just in the evening.
www.telegraph.co.uk/earth/environment/climatechange/, 7 Jun 2009

invasion – The Humboldt squid

The Humboldt squid, which can grow up to 7 feet long, has moved up the California coast as ocean waters warmed. “It’s the latest in a long series of bad news for fishermen,” said a Stanford University researcher, adding that squid have been found as far north as Alaska in the past five years.
www.ktvu.com, 5 Dec 2007

invasion – Giant oysters

Giant oyster specimens have been found on Germany’s North Sea island of Sylt. Marine biologists are unanimous in their explanation for the causes of the Pacific oyster invasion.

“Cold winters can bring the spread of wild oysters to a halt, but warm winters enable the oyster larvae to flourish,” said a marine biologist with Sylt’s Alfred-Wegener Polar and Marine Research Institute. “Their increase is a direct result of global warming.”
www.independent.co.uk, 8 Mar 2008

invasion – Beetles

Aided by warmer weather and the easy pickings of drought-stricken trees, beetles are ravaging Yellowstone’s pines. “Climate change is going to be the most significant challenge to the fundamental premise and foundational management of our national parks that we have ever faced,” said the newly installed park service Director.
L.A.Times, 6 Dec 2009

invasion – Sharks, crabs and other predators

Unique marine life in Antarctica will be at risk from an invasion of sharks, crabs and other predators if global warming continues, scientists warn. Crabs are poised to return to the Antarctic shallows, threatening creatures such as giant sea spiders and floppy ribbon worms, says a UK-US team. Shrimp, ribbon worms and brittle stars are likely to be the most vulnerable to population declines.
news.bbc.co.uk, 16 Feb 2008

invasion – Fungi

Six species of fungi have been found in Scotland for the first time, providing yet more evidence of the general warming of the British climate. The former head of mycology at the Royal Botanic Garden, Edinburgh said, “Changes in our climate are allowing some fungi to possibly jump hosts, and these more parasitic fungi could pose quite serious implications for species that have always existed up here and not been under attack.”
www.scotsman.com, 20 Oct 2004

invasion – Cougars

Climate change could be causing cougar attacks: Alberta’s cougar population has jumped this year because recent warm winters have pushed up the population of deer, elk and moose — the cougars’ natural prey, said Darcy Whiteside with Alberta Sustainable Resource Development.
www.canada.com/nationalpost/news 29 Aug 2007

invasion – Invasive plants


Higher average temperatures and changes in rain and snow patterns will enable some invasive plant species to move into new areas. Insect pest infestations will be more severe as pests such as mountain pine beetle are able to take advantage of drought-weakened plants. Pathogens and their hosts that thrive in higher temperatures will spread to new areas.

National Wildlife Federation website, 2014

invasion – Dragonfly

The damselfly, a flying matchstick of bright blue and black, is the latest of a number of new arrivals from Europe which are thought to have been brought to Britain by rising temperatures caused by climate change, according to The British Dragonfly Society.
www.independent.co.uk, 22 July 2010

invasion – Airport malaria

Global warming is raising the risk for infection with so-called “airport malaria” in malaria-free zones of the United States and Europe, researchers warn.
Here’s how it happens, as the scientists explain it: Mosquitoes make their way on to planes in tropical regions, and at the end of a flight can escape into the increasingly warmer climates of developed countries, where they now have a better chance of surviving and proliferating said the study author and program director of environmental and occupational health at Louisiana State University in New Orleans.

health.usnews.com, 12 Dec 2008