all in a good cause

Sports fields, car parks and parklands will be important assets; houses will have walls that open, and some people might need to lose their water views to prepare for bigger, more frequent floods due to global warming, according to experts contacted by the Herald.

There is consensus in the scientific literature that “the flooding that happens on small urban type of catchments, which is a result of short rainfall bursts, is going up, because convection is intensifying”, Professor Ashish Sharma, an Australian Research Council future fellow in the school of civil and environmental engineering at the University of NSW, said.

Sydney Morning Herald, 12 Mar 2012

the scheme that launched a thousand (and a half) ships

It should be possible to counteract the global warming associated with a doubling of carbon dioxide levels by enhancing the reflectivity of low-lying clouds above the oceans, according to researchers in the US and UK.

John Latham of the National Center for Atmospheric Research in Boulder, US, and colleagues say that this can be done using a worldwide fleet of autonomous ships spraying salt water into the air.

Latham and colleagues calculate that, depending on exactly what fraction of low-level maritime clouds are targeted (with some regions, notably the sea off the west coasts of Africa and North and South America, more susceptible to this technique than others), around 1500 ships would be needed altogether to counteract a carbon doubling, at a cost of some £1m to £2m each.

This would involve an initial fleet expanding by some 50 ships a year if the scheme is to keep in step with the current rate of increase in atmospheric carbon-dioxide levels.

PhysicsWorld, 4 Sep 2008

oysters

Thinking about a romantic seafood dinner for two? Often touted as an aphrodisiac food, oysters may not be on the menu for much longer.

According to a recent Grist article, the acidification of the ocean is threatening the Pacific Northwest’s famed oyster industry.

Since the Industrial Revolution, ocean acidity has increased 30%, and projections are saying it could be 150% more acidic by the end of the century.

Prevention, 12 Apr 2013

cookies

Some must-have ingredients for cookies and other baked goods are already feeling the climate change pinch.

Peanut butter prices are spiking after the southern US saw one of the worst harvests in decades, thanks to out-of-the-ordinary extreme heat over the summer.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture says the peanut harvest is down nearly 15% compared to last year.

Likewise, extreme temperatures in Texas have hampered pecan production, while a recent study published in the journal Science found that yields of wheat are down about 5% since the 1980s.

Prevention, 12 Apr 2013

methane on the rebound

The melting of glaciers driven by global warming portends a seismically turbulent future.

When glaciers melt, the massive weight on the Earth’s crust is reduced, and the crust “bounces” back in what scientists call an “isostatic rebound.”

This process can reactivate faults, increase seismic activity, and lift pressure on magma chambers that feed volcanoes.

This has happened several times throughout Earth’s history, and the evidence suggests that it is starting to happen again. Of course, not every volcanic eruption and earthquake in the years to come will have a climate-change link.

“A particular worry,” writes Bill McGuire in New Scientist, is that such seafloor landslides could “contribute to large-scale releases of methane gas from the solid gas hydrate deposits that are trapped in marine sediments.

Gas hydrates have been identified around the margins of all the ocean basins, and outbursts of gas may occur as sea temperatures climb or as rising sea levels trigger underwater quakes in the vicinity.”

World Watch Institute, 31 July 2006

Another Paris agreement needed!

Global warming is the cause of a number of damaging effects to the earth and its inhabitants, such as climate change, glacier retreat, rising sea levels, and now we may have a new threat on the horizon… world war!

According to the 2007 CNA Corporation report, there is clear indication that as the tensions of global warming continue to heat up, so may the possibilities of war… a Hot War! The first thing we need to do as a nation is concentrate on reducing our own pollution levels.

Each country has the most control over itself and its citizens and should therefore be held accountable for its own actions.

Beyond that, each government needs to open communications with each other in order to help incorporate pollution reduction programs and technologies into every nations lifestyle around the world.

Such a plan would help make current efforts more effective by not only producing awareness on a global level, but providing a consistent plan for all to follow.

Tree Hugger, 4 Jan 2009

can’t see this idea catching on

But when American utilities and other major emitters are simply given free permits to emit greenhouse gases, the effect of the carbon cap is dulled.

That’s why the first carbon auction in the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative — a pact by 10 northeastern states to cut carbon emissions jointly — was so important.

Utilities in the region bid $38.5 million for the right for emit 12.5 million tons of CO2, generating revenue that the states will be able to put toward climate change action.

More important, by forcing utilities to buy emission allowances, the government sends a signal that their carbon caps will have teeth — something to consider when Obama takes his run at national cap-and-trade legislation in 2009.

Time, 3 Nov 2008

new field of study provides solution to climate change!

Simply stated Exopolitics is a new and emerging field of study that examines the implications of possible contact between humans and extraterrestrial civilizations.

Exopolitics also attempts to provide a political framework in which human beings and extraterrestrials could interact. Exopolitics also seeks to examine the disclosure process that governments may be required to use to inform citizens of the authentic nature of an extraterrestrial presence.

It must be assumed that any civilization that has mastered interstellar voyages has somehow mastered light speed travel or a form of interstellar or inter-dimensional travel we as yet do not comprehend.

These civilizations must have developed technologies that utilize arcane energy sources that our scientists and physics cannot explain. Could contact with off-world civilizations be the answer?

If the use of fossil fuels were to stop today and be replaced by energy sources obtained from a developing contact and relationship with off-world civilizations, would the planet enter a new era of environmental design?

The Exopolitical Disclosure Movement provides a unique forum of enquiry that may address and possibly answer the multiplicity of questions presented here.

The only missing piece of the puzzle is the cultural and political will to examine the extraterrestrial phenomenon with the vigor the media examines issues such as child and spousal abuse, political patronage, corporate fraud and who the Canadian Idol is this month.

Exopolitics and Global Warming, 12 May 2006

worst case scenario

The world is now firmly on course for the worst-case scenario in terms of climate change, with average global temperatures rising by up to 6C by the end of the century, leading scientists said yesterday.

Such a rise – which would be much higher nearer the poles – would have cataclysmic and irreversible consequences for the Earth, making large parts of the planet uninhabitable and threatening the basis of human civilisation.

Professor Le Quéré, of the University of East Anglia and the British Antarctic Survey, said that Copenhagen was the last chance of coming to a global agreement that would curb carbon-dioxide emissions on a time-course that would hopefully stabilise temperature rises to within the danger threshold.

“The Copenhagen conference next month is in my opinion the last chance to stabilise climate at C above pre-industrial levels in a smooth and organised way,” she said.

Independent, 18 Nov 2009

see also – just plain scary

greatest long term threat

Climate change is the “greatest long-term threat” to achieving global equality, UK Foreign Secretary David Miliband has told the United Nations.

Mr Miliband said although all countries were affected by climate change, the poorest people within the poorest countries would suffer the most. He called on the richest countries to take the greatest action to combat climate change.

He made the comments in his first speech to the UN as foreign secretary.

BBC News, 28 Sep 2007

autumn leaves

It turns out that climate change is substantially altering the timetable for those famously colorful changing autumn leaves in New England, according to a study released this week by the University of Connecticut.

“Many other studies have shown that autumn could come later each year based on rising temperatures,” says Yingying Xie, a researcher on the study. “But this is the first study to show the interactions of a range of different climate variables on regional ecosystems.”

“Oaks are more drought-tolerant, which may explain why southern New England shows less phonological sensitivity to drought variation than, say, regions dominated by maples or birches,” said John Silander, a researcher on the study. “Species composition makes a difference.”

Yahoo News, 24 Oct 2015

children in Baghdad know what snow is

Snow has fallen in Baghdad, Iraq for the first time in approximately 100 years. Although Baghdad sometimes sees hail and sleet, snow has never been seen in living memory.

Snow was also recorded in the western and central parts of the country, where it is also very unusual, and in the Kurdish north, which is mountainous and commonly sees snowfall.

A statement by the meteorology department read “Snow has fallen in Baghdad for the first time in about a century as a result of two air flows meeting. The first one was cold and dry and the second one was warm and humid. They met above Iraq.”

Dawood Shakir, director of the meteorology department, told AFP his take on the causation of the snow: “It’s very rare. Baghdad has never seen snow falling in living memory. These snowfalls are linked to the climate change that is happening everywhere. We are finding some places in the world which are warm and are supposed to be cold.”

WikiNews, 11 Jan 2008

save the Buddha!

Like any historical monument, Indonesia’s magnificent Borobudur temple in central Java has suffered the ravages of time.

But now conservationists fear the world’s biggest Buddhist temple, topped with stupas and decorated with hundreds of reliefs depicting Buddhist thought and the life of Buddha, faces a new threat: climate change.

As global temperatures rise and rainfall patterns change, the dark stone temple, which dates from the 9th century, could deteriorate faster than normal, Marsis Sutopo, head of the Borobudur Heritage Conservation Institute, told Reuters.

Although no direct link has been found between climate change and the damage to Borobudur, Sutopo said a two-year study by Italian stone expert Costantino Meucci showed that higher precipitation is affecting the temple’s volcanic stone.

Humidity allows moss and algae to grow on the stones already more than 1,000 years old. The stones have been exposed to the heat and humidity for so long, they have reached a critical point where deterioration is going to happen faster, he said. We suspect changing climate will make it happen faster.

Reuters, 6 Sep 2007

save winter!

Jessie Diggins is a cross-country skier on the American women’s team and a favorite to win a medal at the Winter Games in Pyeongchang, South Korea.

Diggins is also an advocate for climate action.

“I’m also someone who lives on this planet. I think you need to be able to stand up for things you believe in, and saving winter is something I believe in. It just breaks my heart because this is such a cool sport, and winter is so amazing and beautiful and I feel like we’re actually really at risk of losing it. And I don’t want my kids to grow up in a world where they’ve never experienced snow because we weren’t responsible enough.”

New York Times, 7 Feb 2018

climatic apocalypse

Thousands of deaths each year from heat stress. Hundreds of plant and animal species extinguished. An inland migration to escape rising sea levels and severe storms. And the end of agriculture in most of the Murray-Darling Basin.

This is the climatic apocalypse facing Australia by 2100, Ross Garnaut warns.

The Murray-Darling region, covering a million square kilometres of south-eastern Australia, has produced not only food but much of the very character of the nation.

It was from these once-fertile and now struggling areas that Henry Lawson and Banjo Paterson came.

The increased frequency of drought, combined with decreased median rainfall and a nearly complete absence of run-off in the Murray-Darling Basin, is likely to have ended irrigated agriculture for this region, and depopulation will be under way, the report says.

Sydney Morning Herald, 5 Jul 2008

see also – just plain scary

rewriting history

Global warming could wipe out more than half the world’s animal and plant species, according to a study that links rising temperatures with mass extinctions of the past 520 million years.

By comparing fossil data with temperature estimates, British researchers have found that four of the five mass extinction events were linked to warm “greenhouse” phases.

The scientists, from the universities of York and Leeds, say their work shows for the first time a close association between Earth’s climate and extinctions in the past 520 million years.

Lead author Dr Peter Mayhew said: “If our results hold for current warming … they suggest that extinctions will increase.”

Sydney Morning Herald, 25 Oct 2007

see also – just plain scary

fewer children

Andrew Revkin, who reports on environmental issues for The New York Times, floated an idea last week for combating global warming: Give carbon credits to couples that limit themselves to having one child.

“And I have even proposed recently, I can’t remember if it’s in the blog, but just think about this: Should–probably the single-most concrete and substantive thing an American, young American, could do to lower our carbon footprint is not turning off the lights or driving a Prius, it’s having fewer kids, having fewer children,” said Revkin.

cnsnews.com, 16 Oct 2009

see also – action plan

cars, boats and planes

The European Commission on Monday unveiled a “single European transport area” aimed at enforcing “a profound shift in transport patterns for passengers” by 2050.

The plan also envisages an end to cheap holiday flights from Britain to southern Europe with a target that over 50 per cent of all journeys above 186 miles should be by rail.

Top of the EU’s list to cut climate change emissions is a target of “zero” for the number of petrol and diesel-driven cars and lorries in the EU’s future cities.

Siim Kallas, the EU transport commission, insisted that Brussels directives and new taxation of fuel would be used to force people out of their cars and onto “alternative” means of transport.

That means no more conventionally fuelled cars in our city centres, he said. “Action will follow, legislation, real action to change behaviour.”

The Telegraph, 28 Mar 2011

see also – action plan

evolution needs to speed up

Certainly, countless species have adapted to past climate fluctuations. However, their rate of change turns out to be painfully slow, according to a study by Professor John Wiens of the University of Arizona.

We found that, on average, species usually adapt to different climatic conditions at a rate of only by about 1C per million years, Wiens explained.

“But if global temperatures are going to rise by about four degrees over the next 100 years as predicted by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, that is where you get a huge difference in rates. What that suggests overall is that simply evolving to match these conditions may not be an option for many species.”

Either evolution speeds up 10,000-fold, which is an unlikely occurrence, or there will be widespread extinctions.

The Guardian, 14 Jul 2013

more crime

Prof Pease, visiting professor of crime science at University College London, is reported by the Scotsman as saying that warmer weather will result in more people on the streets, larger crowds, and alcohol consumption – all of which are all linked to increases in crime.

He says: “The question really is not whether global warming will lead to an increase in street crime, but by how much?”

The Guardian, 11 Apr 2007

less fish

Climate change is likely to hit supplies of many of Australia’s favourite eating fish, including barramundi, salmon, rock lobster and prawns, the most extensive study on the subject yet undertaken by the Federal Government has warned.

The CSIRO study, commissioned by the Department of Climate Change and to be released today, reports the overall impact of global change “will pose some very significant risks to the sustainability of fisheries and aquaculture in Australia”.

The Climate Change Minister, Penny Wong, said the report, a preliminary assessment of the challenges posed by climate change, found it was likely to affect the fishing industry, as well as the regional and coastal communities the industry supports.

Senator Wong said the report was another reminder of the need to tackle climate change through reducing carbon pollution.

Sydney Morning Herald, 6 Oct 2008

extinction crisis

The world is facing an animal extinction crisis, with Australia a key culprit, the largest assessment of biodiversity ever undertaken shows.

One in five Australian mammal species is in danger of dying out, the highest proportion of any developed country, the global survey of more than 44,000 animal and plant species found.

“Within our lifetime hundreds of species could be lost as a result of our own actions, a frightening sign of what is happening to the ecosystems where they live,” the organisation’s director general, Julia Marton-Lefevre said.

“Loss of habitat, over-population, hunting and poaching, as well as the effects of climate change, are all placing pressure on the world’s animals,” WWF Australia’s director of conservation, Dr Ray Nias said.

Sydney Morning Herald, 7 Oct 2008 – screen copy held by this website

see also – just plain scary

democracy on hold

I don’t think we’re yet evolved to the point where we’re clever enough to handle a complex a situation as climate change, said Lovelock in his first in-depth interview since the theft of the UEA emails last November.

“The inertia of humans is so huge that you can’t really do anything meaningful.”

One of the main obstructions to meaningful action is “modern democracy”, he added.

“Even the best democracies agree that when a major war approaches, democracy must be put on hold for the time being. I have a feeling that climate change may be an issue as severe as a war. It may be necessary to put democracy on hold for a while.”

The Guardian, 29 Mar 2010

see also – action plan

stand down

Most advanced countries spend at least 2% of GDP on standing armies, navies and air forces even though the chance of having to repel an invasion is extremely remote.

Destroyers, submarines, fighter aircraft, bombers, tanks and artillery are useless against terrorism and low-level threats and as aids to peacekeeping missions.

In Australia’s case, the chances of needing a sophisticated standing defence force to repel an invasion over the next 50 years would be no greater than one in 100.

The consequences of defeat in total war may be slavery, which is preferable to the annihilation of civilisation and most of the species on the planet – the possible consequence of going beyond the climate change tipping point.

Kenneth Davidson, senior columnist, The Age, 24 Jul 2008 – screen copy held by this website

see also – just plain scary

buses are not enough

“Better public transport systems probably can make a contribution, but they can’t make it quickly,” the Federal Government’s climate policy advisor, Professor Ross Garnaut, said yesterday.

“It’s more likely that we can get faster results through lowering (carbon) emissions from private automobiles.”

Answering questions at a University of Melbourne conference on climate change and social justice, Garnaut said that for more than half a century the growth of Australian cities had been planned around cars.

It would take many decades for this to be turned around, he said, although rising petrol prices were already forcing people to reconsider their reliance on cars.

The Age (Australia), 4 Apr 2008 – screen copy held by this website

poppies with more punch

Greater concentrations of carbon dioxide in a warming world may have a drastic effect on the potency of opium poppies, according to a new study.

While this increase might mean more morphine available for legal pharmaceutical uses, the painkiller is also the main ingredient in heroin.

The current crop of poppies is twice as potent as those grown at carbon dioxide levels seen in 1950, says Lewis Ziska of the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Crop Systems and Global Change Laboratory.

The net result, according to Ziska, is that climate change’s impacts on plants are likely to be chaotic and difficult to predict.

For example, he says, “wheat may make more seeds, but we may have stronger poison ivy and poppies.”

ScienceLine, 3 Aug 2009

the eyes have it

Have those sneeze attacks and itchy eyes that plague you every spring worsened in recent years?

If so, global warming may be partly to blame. Over the past few decades, more and more Americans have started suffering from seasonal allergies and asthma.

Though lifestyle changes and pollution ultimately leave people more vulnerable to the airborne allergens they breathe in, research has shown that the higher carbon dioxide levels and warmer temperatures associated with global warming are also playing a role by prodding plants to bloom earlier and produce more pollen.

With more allergens produced earlier, allergy season can last longer. Get those tissues ready.

Livescience, 16 Aug 2011

the early bird

Australia’s migratory birds are arriving earlier and leaving later and global warming is likely to be a reason, a study has found.

Macquarie University PhD students Linda Beaumont and Ian McAllan and Associate Professor Lesley Hughes have analysed the movements of migratory birds visiting south-eastern Australia since the 1960s.

They have compared the arrival of 34 species and the departure of 12 species over the past 40 years.

Temperature change in Australia of about 0.5 degrees since the 1960s was very likely to influence migratory patterns, Ms Beaumont said.

Newcastle Herald (Australia), 21 Jun 2006 – screencopy held by website

little old winemaker me

In the Yarra Valley, Warramate winemaker David Church is already picking his shiraz and only has cabernet sauvignon to go.

With hot days still coming in, he is struggling to keep everything cool. Vineyards in other areas report being between two and three weeks earlier than usual, the result of an early flowering for the grapes and a dry, warm summer.

There may also be another reason: global warming. At Trestle Bridge Vineyard in the Yarra Valley, grape growers Bob and Betty Young are getting used to early starts.

“We’re three weeks earlier than last year and last year we were earlier than we had ever been before,” Mrs Young said.

The Age (Australia) 13 Mar 2006

bugs

In recent months several Melbourne councils have added their names to the list of areas officially declared prone to termite attack.

Several councils did so in 2004 and at least one more is considering it…It is not clear why termite activity is one the rise, but one clue could be global warming, as evidenced by our apparently warmer, and longer lasting summers.

The Age, 23 Jul 2007 – screencopy held by this website

invasion!

Global warming blamed for Swedish beetle-infestation.

Sweden is 60-percent-covered by forests, and in 2005 timber and paper products accounted for 12 percent of the country’s total exports, for a value of 114 billion kronor, or $17 billion.

Sweden is 60-percent-covered by forests, and in 2005 timber and paper products accounted for 12 percent of the country’s total exports, for a value of 114 billion kronor, or $17 billion.

But now some see nature, in the shape of the five-millimeter, or 1/5-inch, hairy bark beetle, as striking back – induced by climate change.

This is the worst situation we’ve ever seen here in Sweden, said Bo Langstrom, a professor of entomology at the Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.

“Usually, the beetle only produces one brood per year here in Sweden. But last year, for the first time, it produced two.”

New York Times, 2 May 2007

struggles of an environmentalist

I have been researching and writing about anthropogenic climate disruption (ACD) for Truthout for the past year, because I have long been deeply troubled by how fast the planet has been emitting its obvious distress signals.

On a nearly daily basis, I’ve sought out the most recent scientific studies, interviewed the top researchers and scientists penning those studies, and connected the dots to give readers as clear a picture as possible about the magnitude of the emergency we are in.

This work has emotional consequences: I’ve struggled with depression, anger, and fear.

I’ve watched myself shift through some of the five stages of grief proposed by Elisabeth Kübler-Ross: Denial, anger, bargaining, depression, acceptance I’ve grieved for the planet and all the species who live here, and continue to do so as I work today.

Heat Is Online – originally Dahr Jamail, Truthout.org. Jan. 25, 2015

one good …

Lake Illawarra’s little tern population is due back from the northern hemisphere any day in search of safe nesting over the spring and summer months.

Signage and protective fences were erected around the lake’s entrance in a combined effort to protect the species by the NSW Department of Environment and Climate Change, the Lake Illawarra Authority, Illawarra Bird Observers Club and Wollongong City Council.

At less than 25cm long, the leaner, migratory seabird is the smallest tern in the world. Lake Illawarra chairman Doug Prosser said the sensitive little terns’ nesting habits made them particularly susceptible to predators.

He appealed to people not to take their dogs down to the area and “Watch where you put your feet.”

Illawarra Mercury (Australia), 29 Oct 2008 – screen copy held by this website

the early bird lays an egg

Many British birds are laying their eggs earlier in the year as a result of climate change, a report by conservation groups claimed yesterday.

Work carried out by the British Trust for Ornithology (BTO) surveying 30,000 nests showed species such as the chaffinch and robin are laying their eggs about a week earlier than they did during the 1960s.

A similar pattern has been observed for other species such as blue and great tits and swallows.

Dr Mark Avery, conservation director for the RSPB, one of the groups involved in the study, said: “This year’s report shows that climate change is with us already, and from our gardens to our seas, birds are having to respond rapidly to climate change simply to survive.”

Herald Scotland, 15 Aug 2008

all power to the can!

Next week’s National Recycling Week is an opportunity to look a little more closely at who we can all help to reduce the global strain on resources.

Planet Ark has singled out recycling as a key factor in ensuring that communities learn to live sustainably and combat the threat of global warming.

The organisation’s spokeswoman Rebecca Gilling said all sectors of society could contribute to the cause by taking time to consider the benefits that even small changes could have on our environment.

“Recycling a single aluminium can saves enough energy to run a TV set for three hours,” she said.

Newcastle Herald (Australia), 9 Nov 2007 – screen copy held by this website

visible signs

Tibetans are waking up with nosebleeds this autumn as their capital Lhasa experiences record low humidity. The Sunlight City, 3700 metres above sea level, is regarded as especially sensitive to global warming and is heating up faster than anywhere in the world, Chinese media has said.

The Age (Australia), 9 Nov 2007 – screen copy held by this website

girl power

More than half of Sunday Age readers support the introduction of an emissions trading scheme regardless of whether other countries follow suit.

Views of readers on emissions trading and climate change were canvassed in a poll that also revealed a significant gender divide over environmental issues.

Female readers are more likely to conserve water, recycle waste and support Australia going it alone on carbon emissions trading than their male counterparts.

They are also more inclined than men to take shorter showers, buy local produce and restrict garden watering for the sake of the environment.

But four times as many men as women support the introduction of nuclear power to helped cut carbon emissions.

Sydney Morning Herald, 11 Oct 2009

fat chance

Professor David Raubenheimer, a nutritional ecologist at the University of Sydney’s Charles Perkins Centre, believes that the worldwide obesity pandemic is caused by climate change and a low consumption of protein.

Sydney Morhing Herald 8 Dec 2014 – screencopy held by this website

lose the flakes

Dandruff and dog fur may be more than embarrassing inconveniences: they could be changing the world’s climate, new research shows.

Dead skin, animal hair and other materials, such as bacteria, fungi, algae, viruses, plant cells and pollens, have been found to make up a larger part of “aerosol” air pollution than was thought.

By counting and identifying cells in air samples from around the world, a German researcher, Ruprecht Jaenicke, showed that about 25 per cent of atmospheric particles came from these sources in some places.

Atmospheric aerosols play a crucial role in regulating the global climate, and the meteorological relevance of cellular particles could be high, said Dr Jaenicke, of the University of Mainz, whose results were published yesterday in the journal Science.

Sydney Morning Herald, 2 Apr 2005

red helicopter

Melburnians believed their 13-year water crisis – with its withering parks and gardens, dying trees, and the end of carefree water use – was as severe as facing a war or major natural disaster.

Documents reveal the Government’s thinking behind the so-called “red helicopter” advertisements, which featured a chopper-borne Steve Bracks (premier of Victoria – admin)announcing the controversial desalination plant.

Shannon’s Way’s (government’s advertising agency – admin) pitch to the Government was centred on the reassurance and leadership of Mr Bracks, underlying that he has been “correct all along”.

The pitch also said the advertisement should highlight that announcements were “just part of the plan on water”. The helicopter, Shannon’s Way said, was important because of the “vibrant nature of the sound – loud, fast and full. And like the film Apocalypse Now, we can use … the intense sound of a helicopter at full throttle.”

Sydney Morning Herald, 11 Oct 2009

murky water

Warmer temperatures are expected to cause more colored organic matter to run off into lakes, turning the water brown.

That will kill the plants at the bottom of the lakes, as they need sunlight to survive.

That means that the animal species which eat those plants will have to find something else to feed them, which will cause significant drop of their number.

Greenbuzz, 2 Jul 2011

more bugs

Bad news for allergy sufferers — climate change, and specifically warmer temperatures, may bring more pollen and ragweed, according to a 2011 study from the Mount Sinai School of Medicine in New York.

Along with allergies, a changing climate may be tied to more infectious diseases. According to one study, climate change could affect wild bird migratory patterns, increasing the chances for human flu pandemics.

Illnesses like Lyme disease could also become more prominent.

Huffington Post, 11 Aug 2012 What Climate Change Just Might Ruin

not all bad news

A colony of Antarctic penguins could be excused for feeling like climate change’s big winners.

A study has found a group of Adelie penguins on Beaufort Island in the Ross Sea, 3500km south of New Zealand, has significantly boosted its numbers as nearby glaciers have receded.

A team of US and New Zealand-based scientists has used aerial photographs from as far back as 1958 and modern satellite imagery to measure nesting areas and population.

Population size varied with available habitat, and both increased rapidly since the mid-1980s, the team found.

Numbers in the colony increased by 84 per cent as habitat grew by 71 per cent.

The Age, 4 Apr 2013

turtles go the distance

Turtles go the distance. Female loggerhead turtles in Florida, US, increasingly rely on long-distance relationships with males in North Carolina, according to research our of the University of Exeter in the UK.

That’s because the sex of the loggerhead hatchlings is determined by the temperature at which the egg is incubated: warmer temperatures yield females, cooler ones yield males.

So warming temperatures in the US mean that southern populations of loggerheads are increasingly dominated by females.

New Scientist, 31 Aug 2007

pending collapse

The United Nations’ Global Environment Outlook-4 report, released in New York, reveals a scale of unprecedented ecological damage, with more than 2 million people possibly dying prematurely of air pollution and close to 2 billion likely to suffer absolute water scarcity by 2025.

Put bluntly, the report warns that the 6.75 billion world population, “has reached a stage where the amount of resources needed to sustain it exceeds what is available”.

And it says climate change, the collapse of fish stocks and the extinction of species “may threaten humanity’s very survival”.

Launching the report, the head of the UN’s Environment Program, Achim Steiner, warned that, “without an accelerated effort to reform the way we collectively do business on planet earth, we will shortly be in trouble, if indeed we are not already”.

Sydney Morning Herald, 26 Oct 2007

see also – just plain scary

shocking approach

A shark expert has warned that Victoria’s “shocking approach” to beach safety could put swimmers at risk as the state faces what could be its worst shark season, due to global warming.

Ric Wilson, from Shark Patrol Victoria, has called for a statewide revamp of beach patrolling, saying the current system is “abysmal” and swimmers’ safety is “the luck of the draw”.

Mr Wilson – who has made voluntary patrols of Victorian waters using his own aircraft for the past 20 years – says he believes global warming ould be behind an increase in the number of sharks approaching on the state’s beaches.

The Sunday Age (Australia), 30 Dec 2007 – screencopy held by this website

a cruel hoax

After the warmest January on record, maple syrup producers in Ohio were surprised to have recently discovered premature maple tree buds.

The shocking thing about this story is that it is not about melting glaciers in faraway Alaska or snow melt at the North Pole, but about the impact of global warming on a very American rite of spring.

“The gathering of maple sap is how we all here know the season is upon us,” says Joe Logan. “This is a cruel hoax on the trees and us.”

A budding maple tree in early February is bad news for the farmer — and for anyone who enjoys delicious “made in America” maple syrup on their pancakes.

Imminent change is upon us — not just in Ohio and Alaska, but at breakfast tables all across the United States.

Huffington Post, 25 May 2011

moving day

Imagine picking up Scone, carting the town 350 kilometres north west and dropping it in the dust near Moree.

Simultaneously, we would drag the entire Hunter Region into the hot, dry landscape over the Great Dividing Range.

Hunter residents will experience this climate shift during the next 22 years under a ‘moderate’ global warming scenario involving a one-degree temperature increase, according to a report by the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO).

Newcastle Herald, 10 Sept 2007 – screencopy held by this website

designing for climate change

Leading international fashion designers and industry experts say unpredictable and typically warmer weather worldwide is wreaking havoc on the industry.

It is forcing fashion houses to ditch traditional collections for transeasonal garments that may lead to a drastic overhaul of fashion show schedules and retail delivery dates.

So worried are some fashion houses about the impact of climate change is having on the way we dress and shop, they are calling in the climate experts.

The Wall Street Journal reported last month that American retail giant Liz Claiborne Inc had enlisted a New York climatologist to speak to 30 of its executives on topics ranging from the types of fabrics they should be using to the timing of retail deliveries and seasonal markdowns.

Other US fashion retail giants, including Target and Kohl’s have also started using climate experts to plan their collections and schedule end-of-season sales. And from January, Target will sell swimwear year-round.

The Sunday Age (Australia), 7 Oct 2007 – screencopy held by this website

don’t feed the man meat

Climate change is not only a pertinent issue for anyone mindful of the environment, but also an opportunity for a serious recruitment drive by vegetarians.

Australian Conservation Foundation (ACF) research has found that food – in particular beef and dairy – is a major contributor to the average household’s greenhouse gas emissions.

Brisbane Vegetarian and Vegan spokeswoman Maureen Collier said she would try to take advantage of increased awareness of climate change.

“We are hoping that once people realize the effect that a meat-eating lifestyle is having on the environment, they will think more seriously about a vegan or vegetarian lifestyle,” she said.

Sun Herald, (Australia), 24 Aug 2008 – screencopy held by this website

lose the flakes

Dandruff and dog fur may be more than embarrassing inconveniences: they could be changing the world’s climate, new research shows.

Dead skin, animal hair and other materials, such as bacteria, fungi, algae, viruses, plant cells and pollens, have been found to make up a larger part of “aerosol” air pollution than was thought.

By counting and identifying cells in air samples from around the world, a German researcher, Ruprecht Jaenicke, showed that about 25 per cent of atmospheric particles came from these sources in some places.

Atmospheric aerosols play a crucial role in regulating the global climate, and the meteorological relevance of cellular particles could be high, said Dr Jaenicke, of the University of Mainz, whose results were published yesterday in the journal Science.

Sydney Morning Herald, 2 Apr 2005

not so fast

Blooms of toxic algae can occur in the open ocean, a team of scientists has reported. Once thought to be a problem plaguing only the coast, causing fishery closures and wildlife deaths, the research shows that open-sea algae populations also occasionally bloom into a toxic soup.

Since the algae consume carbon dioxide, earlier research by Moss Landing Marine Laboratories director Kenneth Coale had led to proposals to fertilise the ocean on a mass scale to stave off global warming.

The discovery of the algae’s toxicity throws a spanner into these plans.

“We should use this as a caution,” said Mary Silver of the University of California. “Using iron fertilisation as a remedy for global warming would be dangerous.”

Sydney Morning Herald, 15 November 2010

doped up cows!

New research carried out by The University of Nottingham suggests targeted use of hormone treatments could make the dairy industry more efficient and sustainable in addition to cutting greenhouse gas emissions.

Dr Archer, a Research Fellow in Veterinary Epidemiology, said: “Routine hormone treatments could improve efficiency by getting more cows pregnant sooner. This is better for the environment as for every litre of milk produced; fewer animals would be needed, which generates less waste. This applies for any breed of cow and to the majority of farms, except those that are already exceptionally well managed.”

Phys Org, 11 Jun 2015

big winners!

When cockroaches are resting, they periodically stop breathing for as long as 40 minutes, though why they do so has been unclear.

To investigate the mystery, Natalie Schimpf and her colleagues at the University of Queensland in Brisbane, Australia, examined whether speckled cockroaches (Nauphoeta cinerea) change their breathing pattern in response to changes in carbon dioxide or oxygen concentration, or humidity.

They conclude that cockroaches close the spiracles through which they breathe primarily to save water. In dry environments the insects took shorter breaths than in moist conditions.

The nifty breath-holding adaptation has allowed cockroaches to colonise drier habitats, says George McGavin of the University of Oxford, and may allow them to thrive in climate change.

New Scientist, 18 Aug 2009

springback mountains

Though the average hiker wouldn’t notice, the Alps and other mountain ranges have experienced a gradual growth spurt over the past century or so thanks to the melting of the glaciers atop them.

For thousands of years, the weight of these glaciers has pushed against the Earth’s surface, causing it to depress. As the glaciers melt, this weight is lifting, and the surface slowly is springing back.

Because global warming speeds up the melting of these glaciers, the mountains are rebounding faster.

Livescience, 16 Aug 2011

save the trees!

Some 7,000 of around 100,000 tree species in the world are on the international IUCN Red List of endangered species, according to Douglas Gibbs, of Botanic Gardens Conservation International.

But experts believe around a quarter of tree species are already in danger, and that climate change could reduce the range of half the world’s plants and potentially put them at risk of extinction.

The Telegraph, 23 Sep 2008

Christmas – bah, humbug!

Escalating climate change will have an impact on every aspect of Australian Defence Force operations, a report warns, with rising natural disasters and changes to the “physical battle space” affecting Defence’s mission, facilities and strategic environment.

The ADF will have to permanently abandon the idea of Christmas as a time of relaxation and get used to a world where increased floods, fires, storms and cyclones keep it busy throughout summer.

The authors, led by strategic analyst Anthony Bergin and head of the Antarctic Climate Research Centre Tony Press, say the Chief of the Defence Force should appoint a climate change adviser.

Sydney Morning Herald, 24 Mar 2013

shrinking fish

As fish get smaller under man’s environmental impact they will become more prone to predators and a crucial food source will become more endangered than thought obvious, warn scientists.

Previous research has found some key fish species dwindle in size as larger specimens are trawled out and climate change affects the food chain.

Sydney Morning Herald, 1 Feb 2013

rise of the Grolars!

Polar and Grizzly bears would not normally share breeding habitats, but biologists from the American Museum of Natural History have recently reported Grizzlies moving into what was traditionally Polar bear territory, while an article in Nature has suggested that retracting Arctic sea ice may force Polar bears to migrate into Grizzly terrain.

Although Pizzly (or Grolar) bears – that is, Grizzly-Polar bear hybrids – have occasionally been bred in captivity, their existence in the wild was first proved in 2006 following DNA testing of a bear shot in the Canadian Arctic.

Geological Society of London blog, 5 Mar 2014

moving day

Arizona’s low taxes and living costs, friendly culture, arts scenes and easy access to outdoor activities make it an appealing state in which to settle.

And in decades ahead the state’s draw as a new home could be boosted as seas rise and oceans warm, forcing coastal residents to deal with fallout like strengthening storms, floods, mudslides and other disasters.

“We see natural disasters all over the world; but to be very close to one, and experience the utter helplessness, as well as the repeated evacuations, is very, very stressful,” says Jenni Aguilar, who moved her family to a four-bedroom house near Tucson from California on Memorial Day.

Climate Central, 7 Jun 2018

thanks to David Hanig

the clock is running!

A top climate scientist is warning that climate change will wipe out all of humanity unless we stop using fossil fuels over the next five years.

In a recent speech at the University of Chicago, James Anderson — a professor of atmospheric chemistry at Harvard University — warned that climate change is drastically pushing Earth back to the Eocene Epoch from 33 million BCE, when there was no ice on either pole.

Recovery is all but impossible, he argued, without a World War II-style transformation of industry—an acceleration of the effort to halt carbon pollution and remove it from the atmosphere, and a new effort to reflect sunlight away from the earth’s poles.

This has do[sic] be done, Anderson added, within the next five years. “The chance that there will be any permanent ice left in the Arctic after 2022 is essentially zero,” Anderson said, “with 75 to 80 percent of permanent ice having melted already in the last 35 years.”

Gritpost, 19 Feb 2018

thanks to David Mulberry

amphibians jump the gun!

The timing of amphibian breeding is largely driven by environmental cues such as temperature and moisture (Carey and Alexander 2003); because of this, their breeding phenology may be directly affected by global warming.

In temperate regions may be even more susceptible to increases temperatures. Most temperate species spend a large portion of the year inactive, escaping either cold winters or hot summers. Subtle increases in temperature or moisture trigger them to emerge from their hibernacula.

Immediately upon emergence, they migrate to ponds or streams to breed. Thus, one hypothesized direct affect of global warming on amphibians is a trend towards early breeding as the average temperatures increase.

Amphibiaweb, 22 Feb 2006

flesh eaters!

Scientists are working on an improved treatment for a debilitating flesh-eating disease which appears to be on the rise due to global warming.

Should global warming continue to ravage our planet at current rates, the numbers of people suffering Leishmaniasis, a flesh-eating and sometimes fatal disease will increase dramatically, experts warn.

Science Daily, 16 Aug 2007

see also – just plain scary

more infections!

Climate change is the latest threat to the world’s growing HIV epidemic, say Australian experts who warn of the “grim” outlook in the fight against the infectious disease.

A leading professor of health and human rights, Daniel Tarantola, has cautioned that global warming will indirectly make citizens of developing countries even more vulnerable to death and severe ill health from HIV/AIDS.

It was clear soon after the emergence of the HIV epidemic that discrimination, gender inequality and lack of access to essential services have made some populations more vulnerable than others, said Prof Tarantola, of the University of NSW.

Climate change will trigger a chain of events which is likely to increase the stress on society and result in higher vulnerability to diseases including HIV, said Prof Tarantola, who is due to address an HIV forum in Sydney.

The Age, 29 Apr 2008

see also – just plain scary

feathers ruffled

With daytime temperatures above freezing, the rains soaked young Adélie and gentoo penguins not yet equipped with water-repellent feathers.

At night, when the mercury dipped below freezing, the wet chicks froze. The experience, explorer Jon Bowermaster added, painted a clear and grim picture of the impact of global climate change. It’s not just melting ice, he said.

“It’s actually killing these cute little birds that are so popular in the movies.” he said

National Geographic, 2 Jul 2008

suicidal birds on the increase!

For years, airport officials have removed shrubs and trees that attract birds.

They have tried to scare them away with music, pyrotechnics and cannons. They have even raided birds’ nests and culled the adults with shotguns.

Still, birds, often geese, sometimes end up in plane engines, causing inconvenience, or worse.

“There is evidence both in North America and in Europe that birds are shifting their territories,” said Joel L. Cracraft, curator in charge of the department of ornithology at the American Museum of Natural History. “And that has been correlated with global warming.”

New York Times, 16 Jan 2009

more couch potatoes!

According to an August report by the nonprofit National Wildlife Federation, climate change is creating obstacles that can impede our time in the outdoors — namely, by increasing the number of pests.

Nature is critical to health, says Martha Berger, a children’s health officer with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Climate change, she added, could “further alienate kids from nature.”

Huffington Post, 6 Sep 2014

more stings

Insect stings have been on the rise in Alaska, and experts think that global warming could be to blame.

Jeffrey Demain, director of the Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology Center of Alaska in Anchorage, “We think climate and temperature changes are creating a more favorable environment for their survivability.”

Demain and other experts believe this scenario could be part of a worldwide trend of stinging insects spreading northward in response to climate change.

National Geographic, 16 Jul 2008