vegetation invasion

Vegetation around the world is on the move, and climate change is the culprit, according to a new analysis of global vegetation shifts led by a University of California, Berkeley, ecologist in collaboration with researchers from the U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service.

In a paper published today in the journal Global Ecology and Biogeography, researchers present evidence that over the past century, vegetation has been gradually moving toward the poles and up mountain slopes, where temperatures are cooler, as well as toward the equator, where rainfall is greater.

“Approximately one billion people now live in areas that are highly to very highly vulnerable to future vegetation shifts,” said Gonzalez. “Ecosystems provide important services to people, so we must reduce the emissions that cause climate change, then adapt to major changes that might occur.”
News Center, Berkeley University, 4/6/10

that seems clear enough

This strange state of affairs may be rooted in human psychology. As the Harvard psychologist Daniel Gilbert put it in a 2006 op-ed article in The Los Angeles Times, “Global warming is bad, but it doesn’t make us feel nauseated or angry or disgraced, and thus we don’t feel compelled to rail against it as we do against other momentous threats to our species, such as flag burning.”

People tend to have strong emotions about topics like food and sex, and to create their own moral rules around these emotions, he says. “Moral emotions are the brain’s call to action,” he wrote. “If climate change were caused by gay sex, or by the practice of eating kittens, millions of protesters would be massing in the streets.”
New York Times, 20/2/10

lives saved?

In April last year a group of environmentalists shut down E.ON’s coalfired power station in Ratcliffe-on-Soar. The goal: to reduce carbon dioxide emissions and, in their words, “save lives”. Yesterday judge Morris Cooper presented a 20-page judgment accepting there was an “urgent need for drastic action”, but convicted them of aggravated trespass, saying their defence, that their crime was necessary to save lives, could not be substantiated.
The Guardian, 26/2/08

no fragrance in short rice

An experiment by Indian agriculture scientists points to the enormous effect global warming could have on the fragrant basmati rice. Basmati, Sanskrit for the fragrant one, may lose not just its aroma, the famous long grains may get shorter, say scientists.

H Pathak, principal investigator of Indian Agricultural Research Institute’s Climate Change Challenge Programme, told TOI the Tarawari basmati grown in research fields in Delhi did not grow long enough and wasn’t as fragrant as it should have been when cooked.
Times of India, 30/1/11

that explains it!

New computer models that look at ocean temperatures instead of the atmosphere show the clearest signal yet that global warming is well underway, said Tim Barnett of the Scripps Institution of Oceanography.

Speaking at an annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, Barnett said climate models based on air temperatures are weak because most of the evidence for global warming is not even there. “The real place to look is in the ocean,” Barnett told a news conference.

Wired.com, 18 Feb 2005

2050

Perhaps as early as 2050 human habitation will be becoming difficult across central America, southern Europe, north Africa, southern Asia and Japan as well as southern Africa, the Pacific islands, and most of Australia and Chile. Only the far north and south of the planet will remain wet enough to allow large scale human settlement and agriculture.
The Telegraph (UK), 26/2/09

work opportunities for climate scientists

So worried are some fashion houses about the impact climate change is having on the way we dress and shop they are calling in the climate experts. The Wall Street Journal reported last month that American retail giant Liz Claibourne Inc enlisted a New York climatologist to speak to 30 of its executives on topics ranging from the types of fabrics they should be using to the timing of retail deliveries and seasonal markdowns.
The Age, 6 Oct 2006

21 feet (6.4 metres)

Global warming is causing the Greenland ice cap to disintegrate far faster than anyone predicted. A study of the region’s massive ice sheet warns that sea levels may – as a consequence – rise more dramatically than expected.

The implications of the research are dramatic given that Greenland holds enough ice to raise global sea levels by up to 21ft, a disaster scenario that would result in the flooding of some of the world’s major population centres, including all of Britain’s city ports.
The Independent, 17 Feb 2006

invasion – kissing bugs

But could those more-dangerous kissing bug species move north as the climate warms? (members of Reduviid family of insects — the so-called kissing bugs because of their habit of biting people around the mouth while they sleep)

“Absolutely,” says Patricia Dorn, an expert on Chagas disease at Loyola University. “We know the bugs are already across the bottom two-thirds of the U.S., so the bugs are here, the parasites are here. Very likely with climate change they will shift further north and the range of some species will extend,” she says.
University of Vermont, 14/3/12

invasion – tigers

In the past few years man and tiger have been confronting each other more and more in the Sunderbans, and for once, it seems that tigers are getting the upper hand. Climate change is a reality in the Sunderbans. Rising sea levels, constant erosion and increasingly salty waters make life in the tangle of islands and mangrove forests harder for animals.
The Guardian, 25 September 2008

birdwatchers excited

A number of southern Europe’s heron species have suddenly arrived in Britain, in an exotic influx which is exciting birdwatchers.

Mark Grantham, a migration expert at the British Trust for Ornithology thought an anticyclone over southern Europe may have influenced the arrival by pushing birds migrating from Africa too far north, but Britain’s milder weather, perhaps influenced by climate change, was probably another factor.
The Independent, 6/6/07

invasion – the agrostis stolonifera threat

But animals aren’t the only threat to the Antarctic ecosystem. Scientists fear that if global warming causes the continent’s climate to thaw out, introduced plant species could take over. One species of grass, agrostis stolonifera, is a particular threat.

Dana Bergstrom, part of the Australian Antarctic Division and head of a research project on alien species in Antarctica, said: “It’s a species that gets everywhere, it’s already on most of the Antarctic islands.” She said that if the species gets a toehold on the continent “it would just create lawns.”

Scribol, Global Warming causes alien invasion in Antarctica

where’s my haggis?

Global warming could pose a threat to a key ingredient used in one of Scotland’s most famous dishes. An increase in lungworm infections in sheep has been identified by the Scottish Agricultural College Veterinary Investigation Centre. The parasite renders sheep lung – used to make haggis – unfit for consumption.
BBC News, 2 Oct 2008

islands sinking

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The analysis clearly indicates that sea-level in this region (tropical Pacific and Indian Oceans) is rising. We expect that the continued and increasing rate of sea-level rise and any resulting increase in the frequency or intensity of extreme sea-level events will cause serious problems for the inhabitants of some of these islands during the 21st century.
John A. Church and others, Global and Planetary Change, Vol 53, Issue 3, September 2006, pages 155-168

islands not sinking

Using historical aerial photography and satellite images this study presents the first quantitive analysis of physical changes in 27 atoll island in the central Pacific over a 19 to 61 yr period….Results show 43% of islands remained stable on increased in area (43%) over the time frame of the analysis…Only 14% of study islands exhibited a net reduction in island area.
Arthur P. Webb and Paul S. Kench, Global and Planetary Change, Vol 72, Issue 3, 3 Jun 2010, pages 234-246.
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plain leaves

Every fall, Marilyn Krom tries to make a trip to Vermont to see its famously beautiful fall foliage. This year, she noticed something different about the autumn leaves. “They’re duller, not as sparkly, if you know what I mean,” Krom, 62, a registered nurse from Eastford, Conn., said during a recent visit. “They’re less vivid.” Other “leaf peepers” are noticing, too, and some believe climate change could be the reason.
Fox News, 22 Oct 2007

fifty shades of turtles

Even though sea turtles tend to live in warmer waters, the climate changes do affect their natural habitat. The climate is also believed to affect the sex of the younglings.

So if they temperatures continue to significantly increase it is believed that there will be many more females than males in the world. Yet these males likely won’t be able to keep up with the need of the females when it comes to reproduction.
Sea Turtle World, undated

everybody lean this way

Warming oceans could cause Earth’s axis to tilt in the coming century, a new study suggests. It calculates that oceans warmed by the rise in greenhouse gases can also cause the Earth to tilt – a conclusion that runs counter to older models, which suggested that ocean expansion would not create a large shift in the distribution of the Earth’s mass, according to Felix Landerer of NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California.
New Scientist, 20 Aug 2009

feeling under the weather?

Patients who came to him with depression or anxiety were increasingly citing climate change news as something they were having trouble coping with.

“These people tend to have a low threshold to taking on worries. When they pick up the paper and see a small part of Antarctica disintegrating, they take it on board,” said Dr Blashki, a senior research fellow in the University of Melbourne’s Primary Care Research Unit. “They pick up on the negative things going on in the world.”

“It comes down to maintaining hope, to get people motivated, not despairing. Action is a great stress reliever,” he said.

The Age, 6 Apr 2008

is your crabgrass watching you?

Crabgrass will get a strong assist from global warming in its campaign to take over your lawn.

That’s the unexpected finding of a study investigating a very different aspect of lawn biology: Neeta S. Bijoor, her graduate advisor Diane E. Pataki of the University of California, Irvine, and two colleagues set out to determine how warming affects lawns’ emission of nitrous oxide (N2O), a greenhouse gas 300 times more powerful than carbon dioxide.

In contrast to fescue and most other crop plants, crabgrass and many other weeds photosynthesize with greater efficiency the warmer it gets, so they have been predicted to proliferate as temperatures rise.

Live Science, 3 Dec 2008

reptiles head for the hills

Global warming is forcing 30 species of reptiles and amphibians to move uphill as habitats shift upward, but they may soon run out of room to run.

Among 30 species of geckos, skinks, chameleons and frogs, an average shift uphill of 62 to 167 feet (19 to 51 meters) was observed over the decade.

When these results were compared with meteorological records and climate change simulations, the movement of animals could be linked to temperature increases of 0.18°F to 0.67°F (0.1°C to 0.37°C) over the same decade, which corresponds to an expected upslope movement of 59 to 243 feet (17 to 74 meters).

Livescience.com 12 Jun 2008

bury that chocolate

“One of climate change’s potential victims is chocolate. Will the prospect of losing their favorite dessert finally get people to wake up? Some experts are predicting that in a matter of decades a drop in production due to changing weather and agriculture incentives may make chocolate ‘as expensive as gold’. In 20 years chocolate will be like caviar.”
Alternet.org, 12 Nov 2010, “Global Warming could lead to vast chocolate shortage”

work opportunities for psychologists

For people who feel an acute unease about the future of the planet, a small but growing number of psychotherapists now offer a treatment designed to reduce worries as well as carbon footprints: ecopsychology. “Global warming has added an extra layer of anxiety to what people are already feeling,” said Sandy Shulmire of Portland, Ore., a psychologist and practitioner of ecopsychology.

New York Times, 16 Feb 2008

invasion – poison ivy

Another reason to worry about global warming: more and itchier poison ivy. The noxious vine grows faster and bigger as carbon dioxide levels in the atmosphere rise, researchers report Monday. And a CO2-driven vine also produces more of its rash-causing chemical, urushiol, conclude experiments conducted in a forest at Duke University where scientists increased carbon-dioxide levels to those expected in 2050.
NBC News, 30/5/06

2100

The other option is that no controls are imposed on burning fossil fuels, and the carbon bubble does not burst until the warming breaks through the two-degree limit and triggers the natural feedbacks that will carry us inexorably up to +6 degrees C. That implies mass death and possibly civilizational collapse by the end of the century, but the fossil fuel reserves will retain their assumed value for the meantime and there will be no financial crash.
Gwynne Dyer: The third option on global warming, 28 Apr 2013

thanks to Sun Spot

Antarctic ice decreases

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While I was at Palmer, just across the mountains of the Peninsula, the massive Larsen B ice shelf began collapsing at catastrophic speed, changing forever the outline of the east coast. It was dramatic evidence of warming.

After the ferocious summer, changes on the Antarctic peninsula continued faster than scientists had ever anticipated. They were of greater speed, scale and magnitude than had ever been considered possible. Scientists say that they were shocked by warming so fast, intense and widespread.

SciencePoles, interview with Meredith Hooper, 20 Aug 2007

English country garden

The quintessential English garden and lawn are “under threat” from climate change, a government minister warned today. In a speech at Kew Gardens in west London, the environment minister, Ian Pearson, said in future gardeners would need to use water sparingly and choose Mediterranean plant species that could survive heatwaves and drought.
The Guardian, 12 Sep 2006

thanks to a

Iceland will rise again!

Sea levels aren’t the only things rising due to climate change — swaths of land are too, including the nation of Iceland. That’s according to a new study published by a team of geologists from the University of Arizona. According to their research, the melting of Iceland’s glaciers has reduced pressure on the ground beneath them, causing the land to “rebound” from the Earth’s crust.
The Washington Post, 2 Feb 2015

thanks to David Mulberry

witches

In rural Tanzania, murders of elderly women accused of witchcraft are a very common form of homicide. And when Tanzania suffers unusual rainfall — either drought or flooding — witch-killings double, according to research by Edward Miguel, an economist at the University of California, Berkeley.

“In bad years, the killings explode,” Professor Miguel said. He believes that if climate change causes more drought years in Tanzania, the result will be more elderly women executed there and in other poor countries that still commonly attack supposed witches.
New York Times, 13 Apr 2008

less fires in boreal forests

Despite increasing temperatures since the end of the Little Ice Age (circa 1850) wildfire frequency has decreased as shown in many field studies from North America and Europe. We believe that global warming since 1850 may have triggered decreases in fire frequency in some regions and future warming may even lead to further decreases in fire frequency…

The simulation and fire history results suggest that the impact of global warming on northern forests through forest fires may not be disastrous and that contrary to the expectations of an overall increase in forest fires there may be large regions of the Northern Hemisphere with a reduced fire frequency.
M.D. Flanagan and others, Journal of Vegetation Science Vol 9, Issue 4, pages 469 – 476, August 1998

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vanishing redheads

Scientists believe the gene that causes red hair is an evolutionary response to cloudy skies and allows inhabitants to get as much Vitamin D as possible. But if predictions of rising temperatures and blazing sunshine across the British Isles turn out to be correct, flaming red heads could cease to exist within centuries.

Dr Alistair Moffat, managing director of Galashiels-based ScotlandsDNA, said: “We think red hair in Scotland, Ireland and in the North of England is adaption to the climate.”
The Mirror(UK), 6 Jul 2014

thanks to Andrew Mark Harding

march of the super intelligent lizards

“Just when it seemed like we knew all the dangers of climate change, science has to go and throw us this curveball. Warmer temperatures make lizards’ brains develop differently. Last thing we need is some newly super-intelligent lizards judging us.

That’s the finding of researchers at the University of Sydney in Australia, who tested how rising temperatures affected the intelligence of the tiny lizard species known as the three-lined skinks.”
io9.com, 21 Jan 2012

50 inches (1.3 metres)

“The New York City Panel on Climate Change released a report today with a number of unsettling projections for the coming century…Combine that with sea levels that are expected to rise 11 to 21 inches by the ’50s, 18 to 39 inches by the ’80s, and 22 to 50 inches by 2100, and New York City will be at risk from frequent floods.

Queens will bear the brunt of it, followed by Brooklyn, Staten Island, the Bronx, and Manhattan.”
Curbed.com, 18 Feb 2015

see also – sea level

thanks to Igor Karlich

avoid bumping into blind cheetahs

“Namibia is under invasion by multiplying armies of thorny trees and bushes, which are spreading across its landscape and smothering its grasslands. Conservationists have found starving cheetahs that lost their sight after streaking through bush encroached habitats in pursuit of fleet footed food

….an emerging body of science indicates that rapidly increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide may be boosting the onrushing waves of woody vegetation. Are blind, starving cheetahs useful symbols of climate change? You decide.”
The Guardian, 21 Jun 2013

thanks to Andrew Mark Harding

1 ½ feet (0.5 metres)

The level of the Mediterranean Sea is rising rapidly and could increase by up to half a metre in the next 50 years, scientists in Spain have warned. A study by the Spanish Oceanographic Institute says levels have been rising since the 1970s with the rate of increase growing in recent years. It says even a small rise could have serious consequences in coastal areas.

Last month, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change said the world’s sea levels would rise by a maximum of 59cm this century. Some scientists believe this is an under-estimate as it does not include the influence of “enhanced” ice-cap melting, where warmer waters lubricate the flow of ice into the oceans.
BBC News, 19/1/08

see also – sea level

chaos as ocean fills with dizzy fish

Young coral reef fish with misshapen ear bones are more likely to get lost and die, and exposure to warmer waters makes the problem worse, according to a study of fish living around Lizard Island on the Great Barrier Reef, Australia.

Monica Gagliano at the Australian Institute of Marine Science in Townsville, Queensland. Gagliano says that as-yet-unpublished work shows that exposing adult reef fish to higher water temperatures and increasingly acid water – both of which are associated with global warming – increases the percentage of offspring born with asymmetrical otoliths.

New Scientist, 6 Mar 2006, ‘Global warming poses deaf threat to tropical fish’

thanks to Andrew Mark Harding

PANIC!!

The price of beer is likely to rise in coming decades because climate change will hamper the production of a key grain needed for the brew – especially in Australia, a scientist warned Tuesday.

Jim Salinger, a climate scientist at New Zealand’s National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research, said climate change likely will cause a decline in the production of malting barley in parts of New Zealand and Australia. Malting barley is a key ingredient of beer.
ABC News (US), 8 Apr 2008

thanks to Kat Phiche

Snowdon going downhill

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The data collected by experts from the (Bangor) university suggests that a white Christmas on Snowdon – the tallest mountain in England and Wales – may one day become no more than a memory. The figures indicated that this winter Snowdon is on track to have less snow than any of the last 10 years.The results appear to back the growing body of evidence to support climate change.
BBC News 20 Dec 2004

cannibalistic lobsters

First, rising sea temperatures brought on by global warming are encouraging the crustaceans to grow quicker and reproduce more often, says Noah Oppenheim, a marine biology graduate student at the University of Maine.

Second, Oppenheim tells Mother Jones, over-fishing has rid the ocean of the lobster’s natural enemies, which include cod, herring, and other fish.The result is a lot of lobsters that have nothing eat — which is why, as footage taken by Oppenheim shows, they have resorted to cannibalism.
TheWeek.com, 24 Jul 2013

thanks to Russell Cook

speak for yourself, thank you

Australia’s Climate Commissioner, Professor Tim Flannery, believes we must move towards a global ant’s nest, regulated by a global intelligence, and sharing all resources equally. In this world there will be no room for individual choice, individuals will have their specialised roles defined and limited and world population will be massively reduced.
interview 2011- link – – see also BBC News article

thanks to mervyn

leaving on a jet plane?

A federally sponsored inquiry into the effects of possible climate changes caused by heavy supersonic traffic in the stratosphere has concluded that even a slight cooling could cost the world from $200 billion to 500 times that much in damage done to agriculture, public health and other effects.
New York Times, 21 Dec 1975

thanks to mervyn

Fresh warning issued to taxpayers

After Britain’s record-cold December of 2010 that the Met Office failed to predict, Julia Slingo, chief scientist at the UK Meteorological Office, was asked how the Met Office could improve its forecasts. She replied: “Access to supercomputers . The science is well ahead of our ability to implement it.

It’s quite clear that if we could run our models at a higher resolution we could do a much better job— tomorrow— in terms of our seasonal and decadal predictions. It’s so frustrating.

We keep saying we need four times the computing power. We’re talking just 10 or 20 million a year— dollars or pounds— which is tiny compared to the damage done by disasters. Yet it’s a difficult argument to win.” source
The Mad, Mad, Mad World of Climatism, Steve Goreham, New Lenox Books, Il, USA, 2012, Chapter 10, note 11.

6 feet (1.8 metres)

He said sea levels could rise six to nine feet by the end of the century. “We’re not talking the 20 feet that would be necessary to submerge Manhattan. But the Jersey shore of my youth will not exist we continue on this course.”

(Dr Michael Mann, director of the Earth System Science Center at Pennsylvania State University) WFMZ News, 1 May 2013, “Dr Michael Mann warns global warming will create a fundamentally different planet.”

see also – sea level

327 feet (100 metres)

Andrew Bolt: I ask you, Robyn, 100 metres in the next century…do you really think that?

Robyn Williams: It is possible, yes. The increase of melting that they’ve noticed in Greenland and the amount that we’ve seen from the western part of Antarctica, if those increases of three times the expected rate continue, it will be huge…

Extract from transcript of the Science Show, ABC (Australia) on 10 Mar 2007. Robyn Williams is an ABC Science presenter. Andrew Bolt is an Australian columnist and host of The Bolt Report.

see also – sea level

Is nothing safe?

Venice’s gondoliers are being forced by ever-higher tides to “amputate” the tail end of their boats in order to squeeze under the city’s bridges. The boatmen blame the more frequent high tides bedevilling the city on global warming and one of the rainiest seasons in years.
The Telegraph (UK) 17 May 2004, Stormy days on canals of Venice as boatmen cut off gondolas’ tails

Earth speeds up

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Climate change can also affect the Earth’s spin. Previously, Felix Landerer of NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California. and colleagues showed that global warming would cause Earth’s mass to be redistributed towards higher latitudes. Since that pulls mass closer to the planet’s spin axis, it causes the planet to rotate faster – just as an ice skater spins faster when she pulls her arms towards her body.
New Scientist 20 Aug 2009

2050

This methane eruption data is so consistent and aerially extensive that when combined with methane gas warming potentials, Permian extinction event temperatures and methane lifetime data it paints a frightening picture of the beginning of the now uncontrollable global warming induced destabilization of the subsea Arctic methane hydrates on the shelf and slope which started in late 2010.

This process of methane release will accelerate exponentially, release huge quantities of methane into the atmosphere and lead to the demise of all life on earth before the middle of this century….The absolute mean extinction time for the northern hemisphere is 2031.8 and for the southern hemisphere 2047.6 with a final mean extinction time for 3/4 of the earth’s surface of 2039.6
Arctic News: Global Extinction within one Human Lifetime as a Result of a Spreading Atmospheric Arctic Methane Heat wave and Surface Firestorm 9 Feb 2012

see also – Doomsday

thanks to RickW

2012

Over 4.5 Billion people could die from Global Warming-related causes by 2012. Runaway Global Warming promises to literally burn-up agricultural areas into dust worldwide by 2012, causing global famine, anarchy, diseases, and war on a global scale as military powers including the U.S., Russia, and China, fight for control of the Earth’s remaining resources.
The Canadian, 8 Jan 2007 (note: The Canadian website shows the current date above the article, but it appears to have been first published in 2007)

thanks to Rick Bradford

more rain

Climate change ”cannot be ruled out” as a factor in recent heavy rainfalls, such as the flash flooding in Sydney on March 8, the wettest March day for more than 25 years, a report by the federal government’s Climate Commission says. The chief commissioner, Tim Flannery, said NSW was highly vulnerable to climate change.
Sydney Morning Herald, Environment, 14 May 2012
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thanks to Firey

2020

Climate change over the next 20 years could result in a global catastrophe costing millions of lives in wars and natural disasters…A secret report, suppressed by US defence chiefs and obtained by The Observer, warns that major European cities will be sunk beneath rising seas as Britain is plunged into a ‘Siberian’ climate by 2020. Nuclear conflict, mega-droughts, famine and widespread rioting will erupt across the world.
The Guardian 22 Feb 2004

thanks to GSW

disappearing toys

The effects of snow-free winter in Britain are already becoming apparent. This year, for the first time ever, Hamleys, Britain’s biggest toyshop, had no sledges on display in its Regent Street store. “It was a bit of a first,” a spokesperson said.
The Independent 20 Mar 2000, “Snowfalls are now just a thing of the past”

see also Say what?

thanks to RickA

less summer rain

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A change in the North Atlantic current could lead to the end of the soggy British summers, researchers have claimed….. A decline in its speed, however, could cool the North Atlantic and put an end to the pattern, bringing colder but drier summer weather to Britain in future, experts explained.
The Telegraph (UK) 19 Jan 2014

less coral reefs

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Coral reefs will be the first global ecosystem to collapse in our lifetimes. More than 450 scientists from over 60 countries are participating in the “Effects of Climate Change on the World’s Oceans” symposium. When CO2 in the atmosphere reaches a concentration of 450 to 500 parts per million (ppm), the oceans will mostly be too acidic for corals to grow.
IPS News, May 2008

more coral reefs

Coral reefs could be growing 35 per cent faster by the next century because of global warming. A team from the University of New South Wales, in Sydney, modelled interactions between the atmosphere, oceans and ice and found that warmer water would increase the rate of coral calcification, outweighing the detrimental effect of lower calcium carbonate levels. By 2100, corals would be growing 35 per cent faster than they do today, they predicted.
The Scotsman, 8/12/04

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The Earth is not doomed!

Environmental scientist James Lovelock, renowned for his terrifying predictions of climate change’s deadly impact on the planet, has gone back on his previous claims, admitting they were ‘alarmist’.

“The problem is we don’t know what the climate is doing.We thought we knew 20 years ago. That led to some alarmist books – mine included – because it looked clear cut, but it hasn’t happened”.

He added that other environmental commentators, such as former vice president Al Gore, are also guilty of exaggerating their arguments.

The Daily Mail (Australia) 24 April 2012
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—thanks to Mervyn

“We know who the active denialists are – not the people who buy the lies, mind you, but the people who create the lies. Let’s start keeping track of them now, and when the famines come, let’s make them pay.

Let’s let their houses burn until the innocent are rescued. Let’s swap their safe land for submerged islands. Let’s force them to bear the cost of rising food prices. They broke the climate. Why should the rest of us have to pay for it?”

Steve Zwick, Forbes.com, 19 Apr 2012

“The question is whether active denialists who intentionally distort information – not just people who are honestly wrong, but people who are actively spreading disinformation that ends up preventing us from taking preventive action – are essentially setting their own houses and all of our houses on fire. IF that is the case, then what happens when the fire spreads? Who do we rescue first? Note that in my analogy, the fire was already started, meaning that the scientists were right.”

Steve Zwick, addendum and clarification of the original article

“I don’t think that mass murderers of the usual kind, such as Breivek, should face the death penalty. Nor do I think tobacco denialists are guilty enough to warrant the death penalty, in spite of the enormous number of deaths that resulted more or less directly from tobacco denialism.

GW is different. With high probability it will cause hundreds of millions of deaths. For this reason I propose that the death penalty is appropriate for influential GW deniers. More generally, I propose that we limit the death penalty to people whose actions will with a high probability cause millions of future deaths.”

Richard Parncutt, a Professor at the University of Graz, Austria. “Death Penalty for Global Warming Deniers?” 25 Oct 2012

“To protect future generations, our legal systems urgently need extension. They should measures to protect future generations. Exactly what penalties should be applied in what situation is a question beyond my expertise. I have no expertise in international law or criminal law.

But I can imagine that it might be legitimate to consider the question of the death penalty in such discussions – at least as an extreme with which other more moderate penalties can be compared.

It might also be interesting to consider the power of different kinds of penalties as deterrents. The primary aim should not be to punish a small number of individuals (in the sense of exacting revenge). The primary aim should be to prevent serious consequences for a very large number.”

Richard Parncutt, “Death Penalty for Global Warming Deniers?” revised version, 25 Dec 2012